3.16 – Up River, Down River



Content Note: This episode mentions the topic of suicide.

Year(s) Discussed: 1802-1803

As the Jefferson administration awaited word on the outcome of Monroe’s mission to France, the territorial governors and government agents in the western US dealt with various issues including labor shortages, troubled relations with neighboring indigenous nations, and the economic chaos caused by the port of New Orleans being closed to American shipping. To the east, the President and his Cabinet worked with Meriwether Lewis to prepare him for the planned transcontinental expedition as news came from across the Atlantic that would reshape the United States forever. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “William C. C. Claiborne, Governor of Louisiana” [c. early 19th century], courtesy of Wikipedia 

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band

 


S004 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Logan of From Boomers to Millennials, Rosie of History, Eh?, Alex H of Ohio v the World, and Chris of the History of China for providing the intro quotes for this episode! Special thanks also to my husband Alex for providing one of the intro quotes as well as for his audio editing assistance.

If you are so inclined as to leave a review for the podcast to benefit Podchaser’s Reviews4Good benefit where Podchaser will donate to the Meals For Wheels COVID-19 response fund for every review of a podcast or podcast episode left on their website, go to www.podchaser.com and search for “Presidencies” then search for some of your other favorite podcasts and leave them reviews as well. For every review left for this podcast, be it good, bad, or indifferent, I’ll reply with my thanks in order to double the donation.

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Bourne, Edward G, et al, eds. Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the Year 1902, Volume II. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1903. https://books.google.com/books?id=rbMOAQAAMAAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&dq=salmon%20chase%20papers&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q&f=false [Last Accessed: 10 Apr 2020]
  • Dangerfield, George. The Era of Good Feelings. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1952.
  • Donald, David, ed. Inside Lincoln’s Cabinet: The Civil War Diaries of Salmon P Chase. New York, London, & Toronto: Longmans, Green and Co, 1954.
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006 [2005].
  • Gould, Lewis L. Grand Old Party: A History of the Republicans. New York: Random House, 2003.
  • Hopkins, James F. “Election of 1824.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill, 1971. pp. 349-381.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Richard Rush, 13 October 1824,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/98-01-02-4620. [Last Accessed: 8 Apr 2020]
  • Klingaman, William K. Abraham Lincoln and the Road to Emancipation, 1861-1865. New York: Viking, 2001.
  • Landry, Jerry. Harrison Podcast. 2016-2017. http://whhpodcast.blubrry.com/
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson and His Time, Volume Six: The Sage of Monticello. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Co, 1981.
  • McFeely, William S. Frederick Douglass. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 1991.
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • McPherson, James M. Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction, Third Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2001 [1982].
  • McPherson, James M. Tried By War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief. New York: Penguin, 2008.
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.
  • Nevins, Allen. Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration. New York: Dodd, Mead & Co, 1936.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832. New York: Harper & Row, 1981.
  • Remini, Robert V. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union. New York: W W Norton & Co, 1991.
  • Sears, Stephen W. George B McClellan: The Young Napoleon. New York: Ticknor & Fields, 1988.
  • Stone, Irving. They Also Ran: The Story of the Men Who Were Defeated for the Presidency. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran and Co Inc, 1943.
  • Tarr, David R, et al. Guide to U.S. Elections, Sixth Edition, Volume I. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010.
  • Trefousse, Hans L. Andrew Johnson: A Biography. Newtown, CT: American Political Biography Press, 2009 [1989].
  • Turner, Lynn W. “Elections of 1816 and 1820.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill, 1971. pp. 299-336.
  • Wiltse, Charles M, ed. The Papers of Daniel Webster: Correspondence, Volume 2, 1825-1829. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1976.

Featured Images: “John Quincy Adams” by George Peter Alexander Healy [c. 1858], courtesy of Wikipedia and “Andrew Jackson” by Thomas Sully [c. 1824], courtesy of Wikipedia


S004 – Unprecedented Part I



Year(s) Discussed: 1800-1801, 1816-1825, 1860-1864

While some presidential elections function in much the same way as others of the time, there are those select few that reshape the process or are noteworthy for being unique in some way. In the next two episodes of the special series, I will be examining four presidential elections that stand out to me as unprecedented. In this episode, I start with the election of 1824 which saw a four way match up between Secretary of State John Adams, Secretary of the Treasury William Crawford, Speaker of the House Henry Clay, and Senator Andrew Jackson. The remainder of the episode is devoted to the election of 1864 which saw President Abraham Lincoln running for reelection against his challenger, General George McClellan. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: “Abraham Lincoln” by George Peter Alexander Healy [c. 1869], courtesy of Wikipedia and “George Brinton McClellan” by Julian Scott [c. 1888], courtesy of Wikipedia


Balcerski Source Notes



Special thanks to Alex for providing audio editing assistance with this episode!

Links to some of our guest’s other appearances are as follows:

Featured Images: “William R King” by George Cooke [c. 1839], courtesy of Wikipedia, and “Harriet Lane” [c. 1860], courtesy of Wikipedia


Interview with Thomas Balcerski (Bosom Friends)



Year(s) Discussed: 1786-1868

Political partnerships are nothing new to American politics, but what happens when the domestic world and the political realm overlap? To examine that question and learn more about one of the most significant political partnerships in American history, I recently spoke with Thomas Balcerski, author of Bosom Friends: The Intimate World of James Buchanan and William Rufus King. In our conversation, Tom shared some great insights about the politics, ideologies, and society of antebellum America and not only how Buchanan and King fit in to all of that but what studying their lives and their relationship can tell us in turn about larger historical themes. Additional resources for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: Dr. Thomas Balcerski, courtesy of the author, and “James Buchanan” by George Peter Alexander Healy [c. 1859], courtesy of Wikipedia

 


3.15 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Shawn Warswick of the American History Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode, and special thanks to Alex for providing audio editing assistance with this episode!

  • Anderson, Fred. Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2000.
  • Calloway, Colin. The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.
  • Cotterill, R S. The Southern Indians: The Story of the Civilized Tribes Before Removal. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971 [1954].
  • Davis, Harold E. The Fledgling Province: Social and Cultural Life in Colonial Georgia, 1733-1776. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1976.
  • Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne. An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 2014.
  • Henri, Florette. The Southern Indians and Benjamin Hawkins 1796-1816. Norman, OK and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.
  • Kay, Marvin L Michael; and Lorin Lee Cary. Slavery in North Carolina, 1748-1775. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
  • Landry, Jerry. Presidencies Podcast. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • Ostler, Jeffrey. Surviving Genocide: Native Nations and the United States from the American Revolution to Bleeding Kansas. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 2019.
  • Treuer, Anton. Atlas of Indian Nations. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2013.
  • Weir, Robert M. Colonial South Carolina: A History. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1997 [1983].
  • Wilson, James. The Earth Shall Weep: A History of Native America. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1999 [1998].

Featured Image: “Three Huron-Wyandot chiefs” by Edward Chatfield [c. 1825], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.15 – Of Wars and Pieces: The Indigenous Nations Up to 1803



Content Note: This episode discusses the epidemics that spread through indigenous populations in the Americas upon the increased and sustained contact with Europeans starting at the end of the 15th century.

Year(s) Discussed: approx. 9000 BCE-1803

Over the course of millennia, the peoples of the Americas developed rich cultures and prosperous nations that were often unique to one another as well as on the global stage. However, the course of these civilizations was forever changed as European explorers and settlers came from across the Atlantic in ever increasing numbers. In this episode, we’ll take some time to examine the indigenous nations present in what became the eastern and central portions of the United States leading up to the year 1803 and the Louisiana Purchase. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Portrait of Two Chitimacha Indians” by François Bernard [c. 1870], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


Interview with Jon Finkel (Jocks in Chief)



Year(s) Discussed: 1789-2020

The term “fit for office” is often bandied about when talking about the US presidency, but how exactly does physical fitness relate to the office or to presidential campaigning? To explore that question, I recently spoke with Jon Finkel, author of Jocks in Chief. In our conversation, Jon shared the system that he came up with to rank the athleticism of the 44 individuals who thus far have served as president, and we discussed how various presidents approached exercise in their lives as well as how impressions of the vigor of some presidential candidates impacted their campaigns and historical legacies.

More information about Jon and his work can be found on his website at https://jonfinkel.com/.


From Me to All of You: A Quick Note



With the current global situation, I wanted to send out a quick note to express that my thoughts are with all of you out there and to assure you that Presidencies will continue (including with a new special episode coming out on Sunday, March 22nd!). Take care, everyone!


3.14 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Robin for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Dangerfield, George. Chancellor Robert R. Livingston of New York, 1746-1813. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1960.
  • DuBois, Laurent. Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, MA and London, England, UK: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005 [2004].
  • Ernst, Robert. Rufus King: American Federalist. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Hilt, Douglas. The Troubled Trinity: Goody and the Spanish Monarchs. Tuscaloosa, AL and London: University of Alabama Press, 1987.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Livingston, Robert R. “To James Madison, 20 May 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0019. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 18–20.] [Last Accessed: 20 Feb 2020]
  • Lyon, E Wilson. Louisiana in French Diplomacy 1759-1804. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1934.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • Monroe, James. “To James Madison, 9 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-04-02-0601. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 4, 8 October 1802 – 15 May 1803, ed. Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Jeanne Kerr Cross, Susan Holbrook Perdue, and Ellen J. Barber. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998, pp. 497–498.] [Last Accessed: 9 Feb 2020]
  • Monroe, James. “To James Madison, 18 May 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0012. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 12–13.] [Last Accessed: 20 Feb 2020]
  • Monroe, James. “To James Madison, 7 June 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0086. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 72–77.] [Last Accessed: 20 Feb 2020]
  • Monroe, James. “To James Madison, 8 June 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0092. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, p. 81.] [Last Accessed: 20 Feb 2020]
  • Schom, Alan. Napoleon Bonaparte. New York: HarperCollins, 1998 [1997].

Featured Image: “Portrait de François, marquis de Barbé-Marbois (1745-1837)” by Jean François Boisselat [c. 1835], courtesy of Wikipedia