Category Archives: Uncategorized

2.24 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Shawn Warswick of the American History Podcast, Gary Girod of the French History Podcast, and Sam Hume of Pax Britannica for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 8 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0807. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 15 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0856. [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 7 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0885. [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Elbridge Gerry, 30 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4732. [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Boylston Adams, 17 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0817. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To John Jay, 19 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4718. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Samuel Dexter, 2 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4742. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0020. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 23–24.] [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Christopher Gadsden, 16 April 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4907. [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Adams, Thomas Boylston. “To John Adams, 14 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0811. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Brown, Ralph Adams. The Presidency of John Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1989 [1975].
  • Burr, Aaron. “To Thomas Jefferson, 23 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0239. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 342–343.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jun 2019]
  • Cassell, Frank A. Merchant Congressman in the Young Republic: Samuel Smith of Maryland, 1752-1839. Madison, WI; Milwaukee, WI; and London: University of Wisconsin Press, 1971.
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Cullen, Charles T, ed. The Papers of John Marshall, Volume IV: Correspondence and Papers, January 1799-October 1800. Chapel Hill, NC and Williamsburg, VA: University of North Carolina Press and Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1984.
  • Cunningham, Noble E, Jr. “Election of 1800.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1971. 101-134.
  • DeConde, Alexander. The Quasi-War: The Politics and Diplomacy of the Undeclared War with France, 1797-1801. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1966.
  • Dexter, Samuel. “To John Adams, 3 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4702. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.
  • Ellis, Joseph J. Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2001 [1993].
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Theodore Sedgwick, 10 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-24-02-0387. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 24, November 1799 – June 1800, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1976, pp. 474–475.] [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Oliver Wolcott, Junior, 16 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0131. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 257–259.] [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Jay, John. “To John Adams, 2 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4745. [Last Accessed: 6 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Mann Randolph, 12 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0202. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, p. 300.] [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Aaron Burr, 15 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0208. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 306–307.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Monroe, 15 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0430. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, p. 594.] [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Wayles Eppes, 22 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0036. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 37–38.] [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Ketcham, Ralph. James Madison: A Biography. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994 [1971].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linden, Frank van der. The Turning Point: Jefferson’s Battle for the Presidency. Washington, DC: Robert B Luce Inc, 1962.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Schom, Alan. Napoleon Bonaparte. New York: HarperCollins, 1998 [1997].
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • Stahr, Walter. John Jay: Founding Father. New York: Hambledon & Continuum, 2006 [2005].
  • “THURSDAY,December 18 1800.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(ej001636)) [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • “TUESDAY,December 30, 1800.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(ej001636)) [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019
  • US Senate. “President Pro Tempore.” https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/President_Pro_Tempore.htm [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • “WEDNESDAY, December 31, 1800.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(ej001666)) [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • “WEDNESDAY,February 18, 1801.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(ej001666)) [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • White, Leonard D. The Federalists: A Study in Administrative History. New York: Macmillan Co, 1948.
  • Withey, Lynne. Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams. New York & London: Simon & Schuster, 2002 [1981].

Featured Image: “Thomas McKean” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1797], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.23 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Steve Guerra of the History of the Papacy and Beyond the Big Screen podcasts for providing the intro quote for this episode! As mentioned in the episode, Steve will be joining other podcasters at the Intelligent Speech Conference in New York City on June 29th, 2019. It’s sure to be a great conference, so make your plans to check it out!

  • Adams, Abigail. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 10 November 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0787. [Last Accessed: 15 May 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 21 November 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0794. [Last Accessed: 15 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To John Marshall, 30 August 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4553. [Last Accessed: 11 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Pinckney, 27 October 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4667. [Last Accessed: 13 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Abigail Smith Adams, 2 November 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0784. [Last Accessed: 11 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Abigail Smith Adams, 15 November 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0792. [Last Accessed: 15 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “Fourth Annual Address to Congress, 22 November 1800.” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/200693. [Last Accessed: 19 May 2019]
  • Brown, Ralph Adams. The Presidency of John Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1989 [1975].
  • Buchanan, James. “Alfred Moore.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 56-60.
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Cunningham, Noble E, Jr. “Election of 1800.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1971. 101-134.
  • Ellis, Richard E. “Moore, Alfred.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 560.
  • Green, Constance McLaughlin. Washington: Village and Capital, 1800-1878. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Pierce Butler, 11 August 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0055. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, p. 91.] [Last Accessed: 23 May 2019]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linden, Frank van der. The Turning Point: Jefferson’s Battle for the Presidency. Washington, DC: Robert B Luce Inc, 1962.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Pinckney, Thomas. “To John Adams, 16 September 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4592. [Last Accessed: 13 May 2019]
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Withey, Lynne. Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams. New York & London: Simon & Schuster, 2002 [1981].
  • Zahniser, Marvin R. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney: Founding Father. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.

Featured Image: “Portrait of Aaron Burr” attributed to Gilbert Stuart [c. 1793 or 1794], courtesy of Wikipedia


V003 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Jared Cohen for taking the time to speak with me for this interview and to Stephen Bedford of Simon and Schuster and Dan Keyserling, Jared’s scheduler, for all of your efforts in making arrangements for this interview to happen! Special thanks also to Les and Susan for your assistance in brainstorming questions!


V003 – Interview with Jared Cohen, Accidental Presidents



Year(s) Discussed: 1835-2009

In this episode, I talk with Jared Cohen, author of Accidental Presidents: Eight Men Who Changed America, about the presidents who came to the office due to the untimely demise of their predecessor and how their becoming president altered the course of US history. In this wide-ranging discussion, we assess some of the successes and failures of these presidents as well as the history of how constitutional questions related to succession were answered and what questions still remain. Images used in this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Jared Cohen” by Esther Nisanova


2.22 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Niall Cooper of the Assassinations Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Adams, John. “To John Marshall, 31 July 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4473. [Last Accessed: 24 Apr 2019]
  • Brown, Ralph Adams. The Presidency of John Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1989 [1975].
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Cunningham, Noble E, Jr. “Election of 1800.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1971. 101-134.
  • DeConde, Alexander. The Quasi-War: The Politics and Diplomacy of the Undeclared War with France, 1797-1801. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1966.
  • Egerton, Douglas R. Gabriel’s Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 & 1802. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1993.
  • Ellsworth, Oliver. “To John Adams, 16 October 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4663. [Last Accessed: 4 May 2019]
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Ferling, John. John Adams: A Life. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 [1992].
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Oliver Wolcott, Junior, 1 July 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0004. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 4–5.] [Last Accessed: 24 Apr 2019]
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Samuel Dexter, 2 July 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0005. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, p. 6.] [Last Accessed: 23 Apr 2019]
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To John Adams, 1 August 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0036. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 51–52.] [Last Accessed: 24 Apr 2019]
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Oliver Wolcott, Junior, 3 August 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0039. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 54–56.] [Last Accessed: 24 Apr 2019]
  • Hill, Peter P. William Vans Murray, Federalist Diplomat: The Shaping of Peace with France 1797-1801. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1971.
  • Lambert, Frank. The Barbary Wars: American Independence in the Atlantic World. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007 [2005].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson and the Ordeal of Liberty: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Three. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1962.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Monroe, James. “To Thomas Jefferson, 9 September 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0086. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 131–132.] [Last Accessed: 11 Apr 2019]
  • The national intelligencer and Washington advertiser. (Washington City [D.C.]), 04 May 1801. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045242/1801-05-04/ed-1/seq-4/. [Last Accessed: 20 Apr 2019]
  • Schom, Alan. Napoleon Bonaparte. New York: HarperCollins, 1998 [1997].
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • Smith, Page. John Adams, Volume II 1784-1826. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co, 1962.
  • Stone, Geoffrey R. Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime, From the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2004.
  • Toth, Michael C. Founding Federalist: The Life of Oliver Ellsworth. Wilmington, DE: ISI Books, 2018 [2011].
  • “Treaty of Alliance Between The United States and France; February 6, 1778.” The Avalon Project. Yale Law School, Lillian Goldman Law Library. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/fr1788-2.asp. [Last Accessed: 4 May 2019]
  • “Treaty of Amity and Commerce Between The United States and France; February 6, 1778.” The Avalon Project. Yale Law School, Lillian Goldman Law Library. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/fr1788-1.asp [Last Accessed: 4 May 2019]
  • Wolcott, Oliver, Jr. “To Alexander Hamilton, 7 July 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0018. Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 15–17.] [Last Accessed: 24 Apr 2019]

Featured Image: “The Signing of the Treaty of Mortefontaine, 30th September 1800” by Victor Adam, courtesy of Wikipedia


V002 – Sources Used



  • “Portrait of George Washington” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1795], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Washington_1795.jpg
  • “Washington’s First Inauguration” [c. 1899], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Washington%27s_Inauguration.jpg
  • “Thomas Jefferson” by John Trumbull [c. 1788], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Jefferson_by_John_Trumbull_1788.jpg
  • “Alexander Hamilton” by John Trumbull [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Trumbull_-_Alexander_Hamilton_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
  • “Henry Knox” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Henry_Knox_by_Gilbert_Stuart_1806.jpeg
  • “Edmund Randolph”, courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edmund_Randolph,_head-and-shoulders_portrait.jpg
  • “The First Presidential Mansion” by George Hayward [c. 1853], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_First_Presidential_Mansion.jpg
  • “The First Bank of the United States” by Jerry Landry [July 2017] http://presidencies.blubrry.com/2017/07/20/early-republic-sites-of-interest-in-philly/
  • “Alexander Macomb House” by George Hayward [c. 1831], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_Second_Presidential_Mansion.jpg
  • “Residence of Washington in High Street, Philada.” By William L Breton [c. 1828-1830], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PhiladelphiaPresidentsHouse.jpg
  • “James Madison” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1821], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:JamesMadison.jpg
  • “Execution of Louis XVI” by Isidore Stanislas Helman and Antoine-Jean Duclos after Charles Monnet [c. 1794], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Execution_of_Louis_XVI.jpg
  • “Exécution de Robespierre et de ses complices conspirateurs contre la liberté et l’égalité : vive la Convention nationale qui par son énergie et surveillance a délivré la République de ses tyrans” [c. 1794], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Execution_robespierre,_saint_just….jpg
  • “Portrait of Thomas Jefferson” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1791], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:T_Jefferson_by_Charles_Willson_Peale_1791_2.jpg
  • “Alexander Hamilton” [c. 1790], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Alexander_Hamilton_politician.jpg
  • “Washington’s Inauguration at Philadelphia” by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Washington%27s_inauguration_at_Philadelphia_cph.3g12011.jpg
  • “Famous Whiskey Insurrection in Pennsylvania” [c. 1880], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Whiskey_Insurrection.JPG
  • “The Whiskey Rebellion” [c. 1795], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WhiskeyRebellion.jpg
  • “Jay Treaty” [c. 1795], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jay%27s-treaty.jpg
  • “George Washington, 1795-1796” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1795-1796], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Washington_by_Gilbert_Stuart,_1795-96.png
  • “John Adams” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1800-1815], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams,_Gilbert_Stuart,_c1800_1815.jpg
  • “George Washington” by Edward Savage [c. 1790], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Edward_Savage_George_Washington_1790.jpg
  • “George Washington” by Constantino Brumidi after Rembrandt Peale [c. 1855-1865], courtesy of Wikipedia https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Constantino_Brumidi_George_Washington.jpg

2.21 – Source Notes



  • Beeman, Richard R. The Old Dominion & The New Nation, 1788-1801. Lexington, KY: The University Press of Kentucky, 1972.
  • “Decennial Census Official Publications: 1790.” United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade/decennial-publications.1790.html [Last Accessed: 5 May 2019]
  • “Decennial Census Official Publications: 1800.” United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/decade/decennial-publications.1800.html [Last Accessed: 5 May 2019]
  • DuBois, Laurent. Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, MA and London, England, UK: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005 [2004].
  • Egerton, Douglas R. Gabriel’s Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 & 1802. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1993.
  • Fischer, David Hackett, and James C Kelly. Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement. Charlottesville, VA and London: University of Virginia Press, 2000 [2000].
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Monroe, 14 July 1793,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-26-02-0445. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 26, 11 May–31 August 1793, ed. John Catanzariti. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995, pp. 501–503.] [Last Accessed: 13 Apr 2019]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Monroe, James. “To Thomas Jefferson, 9 September 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0086. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 131–132.] [Last Accessed: 11 Apr 2019]
  • Nettels, Curtis P. The Emergence of a National Economy: The Economic History of the United States, Volume II. White Plains, NY: M E Sharpe Inc, 1962.
  • Rawson, David, and the Dictionary of Virginia Biography. “Augustine Davis (ca. 1752 or 1753-1825).” Encyclopedia Virginia. https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Davis_Augustine_c_1752_or_1753-1825. [Last Accessed: 18 Apr 2019]
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Sublette, Ned, and Constance Sublette. The American Slave Coast: A History of the Slave-Breeding Industry. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2016.
  • Taylor, Alan. The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia 1772-1832. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2014 [2013].

Featured Image: “André Rigaud”, courtesy of Wikipedia


V001 – Sources Used



  • Bearfield, Domonic A. “What is Patronage? A Critical Reexamination.” Public Administration Review. 69:1 (Jan/Feb 2009) 64-76.
  • Bogle, Lori Lyn. “Pandering to the Crowd: The American Governing Elite’s Changing Views on Mass Media and Publicity.” Journalism History. 43:2 (Summer 2017) 62-74.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • Morris, Edmund. The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt. New York: The Modern Library, 2001 [1979].
  • Neuzil, Mark. “Hearst, Roosevelt, and the Muckrake Speech of 1906: A New Perspective.” Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. 73:1 (Spring 1996) 29-39.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. Grant. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001.
  • “The Case for Tammany Hall Being On The Right Side Of History.” Fresh Air. NPR, Philadelphia, 5 Mar 2014.

Other Recommended Sources:

  • Allen, Oliver E. The Tiger: The Rise and Fall of Tammany Hall. Da Capo Press, 1993.
  • Golway, Terry. Machine Made: Tammany Hall and the Creation of Modern American Politics. Liveright, 2004.
  • LaCerra, Charles. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Tammany Hall of New York. University Press of America, 1997.

Images Used in Video:

  • “The Treaty of Penn with the Indians” by Benjamin West [c. 1771-1772], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “George Clinton” by Ezra Ames [c. 1814], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Portrait of Aaron Burr, 1802” by John Vanderlyn [c. 1802], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Andrew Jackson” by Thomas Sully [c. 1824], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “William Marcy “Boss” Tweed” [c. before 1873], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Tammany Hall & 14th St West, New York City” by Irving Underhill [c. 1914], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Interior view of Tammany Hall decorated for the National Convention July 4th, 1868” by W C Rogers & Co [c. 1868], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Samuel Jones Tilden” by Frank Fowler [c. 1866-1910], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Theodore Roosevelt” by Harris and Ewing [c. 1901-1908], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Portrait of Charles F Murphy” by Falk [c. prior to 1903], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Photograph of Al Smith” by Harris & Ewing [c. 1920s-1930s], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “William Randolph Hearst” by James E Purdy [c. 1906], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1933” by Elias Goldensky [c. 1933], courtesy of Wikipedia
  • “F. H. LaGuardia” by Bain News Service [c. 1915-1920], courtesy of Wikipedia

Featured Image: “William Marcy ‘Boss’ Tweed”


V001 – Tammany Hall and the Presidencies



Year(s) Discussed: 1789-1967

In response to Jacob from The Podcast on Germany‘s question, I examine the relationship between the historically influential political organization of Tammany Hall and the presidents of the United States. Whether in support of or in opposition to Tammany, many presidents over the centuries have interacted with this New York City institution.

The video version of this episode can be found at https://vimeo.com/331561127

Sources used for this episode and other recommended resources can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Tammany Hall & 14th St West, New York City” by Irving Underhill [c. 1914], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.20 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Jacob Collier of the Podcast on Germany for providing the intro quote for this episode!

For those who would like to support the podcast through the Wish List option, the link is now available!

  • Adams, John. “To Timothy Pickering, 13 August 1799,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-3877. [Last Accessed: 28 Mar 2019]
  • Adams, John. “21 May 1800, Proclamation—Granting Pardon to Certain Persons Engaged in Insurrection Against the United States in the Counties of Northampton, Montgomery, and Bucks, in the State of Pennsylvania.” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202254 [Last Accessed: 23 Mar 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Charles Lee, 21 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4356. [Last Accessed: 27 Mar 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To James McHenry, 22 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4362. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To William Stephens Smith, 26 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0680. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Sc., Citizens of Georgetown, 31 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4388. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Abigail Smith Adams, 13 June 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0695. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • Brown, Ralph Adams. The Presidency of John Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1989 [1975].
  • Hogeland, William. The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America’s Newfound Sovereignty. New York: Scribner, 2006.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • McHenry, James. “To John Adams, 23 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4367. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • “MONDAY,May 12, 1800.” Senate Executive Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(ej001623)) [Last Accessed: 27 Mar 2019]
  • Newman, Paul Douglas. Fries’s Rebellion: The Enduring Struggle for the American Revolution. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005 [2004].
  • Owens, Robert M. Jefferson’s Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007.
  • Schlesinger, Arthur M, Jr, ed. History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill, 1971.
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Smith, Page. John Adams, Volume II 1784-1826. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co, 1962.
  • Smith, William Stephens. “To John Adams, 21 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, version of January 18, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0674. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2019]
  • Stone, Geoffrey R. Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime, From the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2004.
  • Withey, Lynne. Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams. New York & London: Simon & Schuster, 2002 [1981].

Featured Image: “Samuel Chase” by John Beale Bordley [c. 1836], courtesy of Wikipedia