Category Archives: Uncategorized

3.285 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Nora Hahn for providing the intro quote for this episode, and be sure to check out her performance in Mama’s Boy at the Stagework Theatre in Houston, TX, running from 9 April to 2 May 2021. Special thanks also to the audio editor for this episode, Andrew Pfannkuche.

  • Birle, Ann Lucas; and Lisa A Francavilla, eds. Thomas Jefferson’s Granddaughter in Queen Victoria’s England: The Travel Diary of Ellen Wayles Coolidge, 1838-1839. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2011.
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Gordon-Reed, Annette. The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2008.
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Kranish, Michael. Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • Kukla, Jon. Jefferson’s Women. New York: Vintage Books, 2008 [2007].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson and the Rights of Man: Jefferson and His Time Volume Two. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Co, 1951.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the Virginian: Jefferson and His Time, Volume One. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1948.
  • “RANDOLPH, Thomas Mann 1768 – 1828.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000051. [Last Accessed: 3 Mar 2021]

Featured Image: “Abbaye de Penthemont, rue de Grenelle, Paris” by Eugène Atget [c. 1898], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.28 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Anthony of Disastrous History for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Brighton, Ray. The Checkered Career of Tobias Lear. Portsmouth, NH: Portsmouth Marine Society, 1985.
  • Eicher, Peter D. Raising the Flag: America’s First Envoys in Faraway Lands. Lincoln, NE: Potomac Books, 2018.
  • Lambert, Frank. The Barbary Wars: American Independence in the Atlantic World. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007 [2005].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • McKee, Christopher. Edward Preble: A Naval Biography, 1761-1807. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1996 [1972].
  • Zacks, Richard. The Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, the First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805. New York: Hyperion, 2005.

Featured Image: “First Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon,” courtesy of Wikipedia

 


State of the Podcast Update



As there have been some recent developments here at Presidencies HQ, I just wanted to give everyone a quick update.

Spoiler: The podcast is not going away, though there may be some delays in the next couple of months.


Intelligent Speech Conference 2021



I’m excited to share that I will be presenting at the Intelligent Speech Conference on Saturday, April 24th, 2021! If you would like to attend, please take a moment to listen to this quick trailer for more information, go to www.intelligentspeechconference.com, and use the promo code “presi” to get 10% off your ticket to 24 hours of content available on 4 simultaneous streams. It should be a great experience, so I hope you’ll join us!


3.27 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Roderick Aust for providing the intro quote for this episode, and be sure to check out the Zoom Shakespeare Company on Facebook! Special thanks also to our audio editor, Andrew Pfannkuche, for his work on this episode!

Featured Image: “Jacob Crowninshield” by Robert Cutler Hinckley [c. 1921], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.235 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Alex for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Fenster, Julie M. Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation. New York: Broadway Books, 2016.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 24 June 1799,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-31-02-0120. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 31, 1 February 1799 – 31 May 1800, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004, pp. 137–139.] [Last Accessed: 2 Feb 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 13 March 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0009. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 9–13.] [Last Accessed: 3 Feb 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 15 April 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0209. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 242–243.] [Last Accessed: 3 Feb 2021]
  • “MITCHILL, Samuel Latham.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000831. [Last Accessed: 2 Feb 2021]
  • Treuer, Anton. Atlas of Indian Nations. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2013.

Featured Image: “William Dunbar” [c. 1800], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.26 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Countryboi of One Mic: Black History Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Andrew Pfannkuche for his audio editing assistance with this episode!

  • Brodie, Fawn M. Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History. New York: Bantam Books, 1985 [1974].
  • Gordon-Reed, Annette. The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2008.
  • Hemings, Madison. “Life among the Lowly, No. 1.” Pike County (Ohio) Republican. 13 Mar 1873. Reprinted in Sally Hemings & Thomas Jefferson: History, Memory, and Civic Culture. Jan Ellen Lewis and Peter S. Onuf, eds. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1999].
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Francis Eppes, 30 August 1785,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-15-02-0597. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 15, 27 March 1789 – 30 November 1789, ed. Julian P. Boyd. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1958, pp. 621–623.] [Last Accessed: 2 Jan 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 21 January 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1020. [Last Accessed: 30 Nov 2020]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the Virginian: Jefferson and His Time, Volume One. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1948.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Miller, John Chester. The Wolf by the Ears: Thomas Jefferson and Slavery. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1991 [1977].
  • Sublette, Ned, and Constance Sublette. The American Slave Coast: A History of the Slave-Breeding Industry. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2016.

Additional information on the Hemings family can be found at the Monticello website.

Featured Image: “Col. John Wayles Jefferson of the Union Army, son of Eston Hemings,” courtesy of Wikipedia


S008 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Andrew Pfannkuche for this audio editing assistance and to Dave Broker of the Industrial Revolutions Podcast, Kenny Ryan of the [Abridged] Presidential Histories podcast, and my husband Alex for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Chernow, Ron. Grant. New York: Penguin Press, 2017.
  • CQ Press. Guide to U.S. Elections, Fifth Edition, Volume II. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2005.
  • Flick, Alexander Clarence. Samuel Jones Tilden: A Study in Political Sagacity. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1963 [1939].
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006 [2005].
  • Hancock, Almira R. Reminiscences of Winfield Scott Hancock. New York: Charles L Webster & Co, 1887.
  • Holt, Michael F. By One Vote: The Disputed Presidential Election of 1876. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2008.
  • Hoogenboom, Ari. Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior & President. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1995.
  • Jordan, David M. Winfield Scott Hancock: A Soldier’s Life. Bloomington, IN and Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996 [1988].
  • McFeely, William S. Grant: A Biography. New York and London: WW Norton & Co, 1982 [1981].
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • McPherson, James M. Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction, Third Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2001 [1982].
  • Morris, Roy, Jr. Fraud of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and the Stolen Election of 1876. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003.
  • Muzzey, David Saville. James G. Blaine: A Political Idol of Other Days. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1963 [1934].
  • Nevins, Allan. Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration. New York: Dodd, Mead & Co, 1936.
  • Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. “Party Divisions of the House of Representatives, 1789 to Present.” United States House of Representatives. https://history.house.gov/Institution/Party-Divisions/Party-Divisions/. [Last Accessed: 24 Nov 2020]
  • Smith, Jean Edward. Grant. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001.
  • Tarr, David R, et al. Guide to U.S. Elections, Sixth Edition, Volume I. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010.
  • Urofsky, Melvin I. A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States, Volume I: To 1877. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988.
  • Van Deusen, Glyndon G. Horace Greeley: Nineteenth-Century Crusader. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1953.
  • Williams, T Harry, ed. Hayes: The Diary of a President, 1875-1881. New York: David McKay Co Inc, 1964.
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats. New York: Random House, 2003.

Featured Image: “The Florida Case before the Electoral Commission” by Cornelia Adèle Strong Fassett, courtesy of Wikipedia


3.25 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Howard and Jess from Plodding Through the Presidents for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • “Certificate of Sale and Manumission of John Freeman, 23 July 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-0131. [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Fourth Annual Message, 8 November 1804,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202713. [Last Accessed: 10 Nov 2020]
  • Johnson, David. John Randolph of Roanoke. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
  • Johnson, Herbert A. The Chief Justiceship of John Marshall, 1801-1835. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1997.
  • Kirk, Russell. John Randolph of Roanoke: A Study in American Politics, With Selected Speeches and Letters, Fourth Edition. Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund, 1997 [1951].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • Matthews, Marty D. Forgotten Founder: The Life and Times of Charles Pinckney. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2004.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Paul, Joel Richard. Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times. New York: Riverhead Books, 2018.
  • Presser, Stephen B. “Chase, Samuel.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 137-139.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • “TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1804, 4 o’clock, P. M.” Senate Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(sj003516)). [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]

Featured Image: “Areas involved in the Yazoo-Georgia land scandal” [c. 1915], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.24 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Theshira Pather of the Legendary Africa podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Armstrong, John, Jr. “To Thomas Jefferson, 2 June 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0419. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, p. 527.] [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]
  • Buchanan, James. “Alfred Moore.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 56-60.
  • Chenicek, Jolynda Brock. Dereliction of Diplomacy: The American Consulates in Paris and Bordeaux during the Napoleonic Era, 1804-1815. Diss. Tallahassee, FL: Florida State University, 2008. https://fsu.digital.flvc.org/islandora/object/fsu%3A182067. [Last Accessed: 23 Sep 2020]
  • Claiborne, William C C. “To Thomas Jefferson, 25 February 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-42-02-0469. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 42, 16 November 1803–10 March 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016, pp. 542–543.] [Last Accessed: 4 Oct 2020]
  • Crackel, Theodore J. Jefferson’s Army: Political and Social Reform of the Military Establishment, 1801-1809. New York and London: New York University Press, 1987.
  • Dangerfield, George. Chancellor Robert R. Livingston of New York, 1746-1813. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1960.
  • Dauer, Manning. “Election of 1804.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill, 1971. pp. 159-169.
  • Ellis, Richard E. “Moore, Alfred.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 560.
  • Ernst, Robert. Rufus King: American Federalist. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
  • Gannon, Kevin M. “Escaping ‘Mr. Jefferson’s Plan of Destruction’: New England Federalists and the Idea of a Northern Confederacy, 1803-1804.” Journal of the Early Republic. 21:3 [Fall 2001] 413-443.
  • Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. Lafayette, LA: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 1976.
  • Historical Currency Converter (test version 1.0). http://www.historicalstatistics.org/Currencyconverter.html. [Last Accessed: 22 Sep 2020)
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Monroe, 8 January 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-42-02-0223. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 42, 16 November 1803–10 March 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016, pp. 245–251.] [Last Accessed: 23 Sep 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on Supreme Court Candidates, 17 February 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-42-02-0431. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 42, 16 November 1803–10 March 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016, pp. 497–498.] [Last Accessed: 20 Sep 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To the Senate, 22 March 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0064. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 71–72.] [Last Accessed: 21 Sep 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Armstrong of New York, 26 May 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0378. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 490–491.] [Last Accessed: 5 Nov 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Constantin François Chasseboeuf Volney, 8 February 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1123. [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Livingston, Robert R. “To Thomas Jefferson, 12 Mar 1803.” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0037-0003. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 44–48.] [Last Accessed: 5 Nov 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To Robert R. Livingston, 7 February 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-06-02-0410. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 6, 1 November 1803 – 31 March 1804, ed. Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Angela Kreider. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2002, pp. 446–447.] [Last Accessed: 5 Nov 2020]
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • Pride, David T. “William Johnson.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 66-70.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821.New York: Harper & Row, 1977.
  • Skeen, C Edward. John Armstrong, Jr. 1758-1843: A Biography. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1981.
  • VanBurkleo, Sandra F. “William Johnson.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 449-450.
  • Washington, George. “Statement before delivering response to the first Newburgh Address | Saturday, March 15, 1783.” George Washington’s Mount Vernon. https://www.mountvernon.org/library/digitalhistory/quotes/article/gentlemen-you-will-permit-me-to-put-on-my-spectacles-for-i-have-grown-not-only-gray-but-almost-blind-in-the-service-of-my-country/. [Last Accessed: 5 Nov 2020]
  • Zahniser, Marvin R. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney: Founding Father. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.

Featured Images: “Major General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney” by James Earl [c. 1795-1796], courtesy of Wikipedia, and “Rufus King” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1818], courtesy of Wikipedia