All posts by presidencies

S005 – Unprecedented Part II



Year(s) Discussed: 1936-1944

With increasing uncertainty in the global situation and continued instability in the domestic economy, candidates lined up on both the Democratic and Republican sides to succeed Franklin Roosevelt at the end of his second term. However, 1940 found the President considering what was previously unthinkable: running for a third term of office. In this special episode, we explore this unprecedented election conducted under the looming threat of being drawn into a war waging abroad. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Wendell Willkie, President of the Commonwealth & Southern Corporation appearing before House Military Affairs Subcommittee” by Harris & Ewing [17 May 1939], courtesy of Wikipedia


Intelligent Speech Conference 2020



I will be presenting on the Rebellions of the Early Presidencies at the Intelligent Speech Conference on Saturday, June 27th, 2020. If you’d like to attend and hear from numerous educational podcasters and historians, be sure to go to www.intelligentspeechconference.com and select “Book Now” to get your online ticket. It should be a great conference, so I hope to see you there!


3.18 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Chris and Åsa of the Flatpack History of Sweden podcast for providing the intro quotes for this episode! Special thanks also to Alex for some last minute audio editing assistance!

  • Bemis, Samuel Flagg. John Quincy Adams and the Foundations of American Foreign Policy. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1956.
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Ellis, Joseph J. American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson. New York: Vintage Books, 1998 [1996].
  • Fischer, David Hackett. The Revolution of American Conservatism: The Federalist Party in the Era of Jeffersonian Democracy. New York: Harper & Row, 1965.
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Gallatin, Albert. “To Thomas Jefferson, 13 January 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0281. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 324–327.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Garland, Hugh A. The Life of John Randolph of Roanoke. St. Clair Shores, MI: Scholarly Press, 1970 [1850].
  • Gordon-Reed, Annette. Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1997 [1997].
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Robert R. Livingston, 10 October 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-38-02-0435. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 38, 1 July–12 November 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011, pp. 476–477.] [Last Accessed: 6 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Albert Gallatin, 13 January 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0282. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 327–328.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Proclamation—Convening an Extra Session of the Congress, 16 Jul 1803,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/204771. [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “III. Jefferson’s Revision of Original Draft, 12–17 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0530-0004. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 699–701.] [Last Accessed: 6 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William C. C. Claiborne, 18 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-41-02-0052. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 41, 11 July–15 November 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014, p. 84.] [Last Accessed: 6 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Wilson Cary Nicholas, 7 September 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-41-02-0255. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 41, 11 July–15 November 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014, pp. 346–348.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Madison, 14 September 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-41-02-0283. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 41, 11 July–15 November 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014, p. 382.] [Last Accessed: 8 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Third Annual Message, 17 October 1803.” Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, eds. The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202655. [Last Accessed: 8 May 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Special Message, 21 October 1803.” Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/204966. [Last Accessed: 16 May 2020]
  • Ketcham, Ralph. James Madison: A Biography. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994 [1971].
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lincoln, Levi. “To Thomas Jefferson, 10 January 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0261. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 302–305.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Livingston, Robert R. “To Thomas Jefferson, 2 June 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0352. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 470–474.] [Last Accessed: 8 May 2020]
  • Madison, James. ““Proposed Constitutional Amendment, [ca. 9 July] 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0198. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, p. 156.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe, 29 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0271. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 238–240.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To James Monroe, 30 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0275. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 248–250.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To Daniel Clark, 16 September 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0442. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 428–429.] [Last Accessed: 8 May 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To Carlos Martínez de Yrujo, 4 October 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-05-02-0500. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 5, 16 May–31 October 1803, ed. David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Ellen J. Barber, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Bradley J. Daigle. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000, pp. 488–489.] [Last Accessed: 8 May 2020]
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the Virginian: Jefferson and His Time, Volume One. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1948.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • Nicholas, Wilson Cary. “To Thomas Jefferson, 3 September 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-41-02-0243. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 41, 11 July–15 November 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014, pp. 312–314.] [Last Accessed: 3 May 2020]

Featured Image: “William Duane” by Charles Balthazar Julien Févret de Saint-Mémin [c. 1802], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.18 – The Boys Are Back in Town



Year(s) Discussed: 1801-1803

Though the Louisiana Purchase Treaty had been concluded, President Jefferson understood that didn’t mean it was a done deal, and he and his administration got to work in the latter half of 1803 on getting the treaty ratified by the Senate and in pushing through legislation to carry through the purchase. However, they also had to contend with increased criticism in the press and with a gnawing concern in many minds, including that of the President, that there was nothing in the Constitution that said the United States could in fact acquire new territory. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “William Plumer, head-and-shoulders portrait, right profile” by Charles Balthazar Julien Févret de Saint-Mémin [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.17 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Jonny Langton of the Kings and Queens Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode! You can find his podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Anchor.fm!

Special thanks to Alex for providing audio editing assistance with this episode!

  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Balinky, Alexander. Albert Gallatin: Fiscal Theories and Policies. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1958.
  • Brighton, Ray. The Checkered Career of Tobias Lear. Portsmouth, NH: Portsmouth Marine Society, 1985.
  • Eppes, John Wayles. “To Thomas Jefferson, 14 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0142. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 190–191.] [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]
  • “Eppes, John Wayles (1773-1823).” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguideretro.congress.gov/Home/MemberDetails?memIndex=E000197. [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Gallatin, Albert. “To Thomas Jefferson, 21 March 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0074. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 91–94.] [Last Accessed: 21 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “First Annual Message [8 Dec 1801].” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202536. [Last Accessed: 15 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Second Annual Message, 15 December 1802,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202594. [Last Accessed: 15 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Albert Gallatin, 28 March 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0092. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 111–112.] [Last Accessed: 15 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Samuel J. Cabell, 25 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0194. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 269–270.] [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Lewis Harvie, 28 May 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0333. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 442–443.] [Last Accessed: 26 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Meriwether Lewis, 16 November 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-42-02-0005-0001. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 42, 16 November 1803–10 March 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016, pp. 6–9.] [Last Accessed: 27 Apr 2020]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Lambert, Frank. The Barbary Wars: American Independence in the Atlantic World. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007 [2005].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lewis, Meriwether. “To Thomas Jefferson, 3 October 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-41-02-0342. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 41, 11 July–15 November 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014, pp. 463–468.] [Last Accessed: 27 Apr 2020]
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • McKee, Christopher. Edward Preble: A Naval Biography, 1761-1807. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1996 [1972].
  • Randolph, Thomas Mann. “To Thomas Jefferson, 29 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0213. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 284–285.] [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]
  • Randolph, Thomas Mann. “To Thomas Jefferson, 22 May 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0317. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 416–417.] [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]
  • Randolph, Thomas Mann. “To Thomas Jefferson 10 June 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0391. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 523–524.] [Last Accessed: 28 Apr 2020]

Featured Image: “Alexander Murray” [c. 1798], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.17 – Sailing in New Waters



Year(s) Discussed: 1802-1803

Despite some early successes, the US naval efforts against Tripoli languished in 1802 and early 1803, and with the cost of maintaining a squadron in the Mediterranean climbing, President Jefferson and his administration had to consider alternates in both leadership and approaches to tackle the situation. Meanwhile, various young men in Jefferson’s life moved into new roles in 1803, and the President’s personal and political realms began to overlap in new ways. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Dutch Ships off Tripoli” by Reinier Nooms [c. mid 17th century], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


Chervinsky Source Notes



Lindsay Chervinsky’s website where you can check out some of her other appearances on film and other podcasts, sign up for her monthly newsletter, or purchase a copy of The Cabinet.

The White House Historical Association has great articles and online resources for learning about presidential history including Washington’s tenure of office.

In case you missed the Washington series of this podcast, all episodes are available to stream through the website or for download on your podcast app of choice.

Featured Images: “William Bradford, Attorney General” by William E Winner [c. 1872], courtesy of Wikipedia, and cover image of The Cabinet, courtesy of the author


Interview with Lindsay Chervinsky



Year(s) Discussed: 1789-1809

George Washington established many precedents during his tenure of office, but one that had arguably the greatest impact was his establishment, not by law but by practice, of what we now know of as the Cabinet. To examine the beginnings of this institution and what it meant for the Washington presidency, I am joined in this special episode by Lindsay Chervinsky, a historian with the White House Historical Association and author of The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution. In our conversation, Lindsay provided great insights into Washington’s thought process in turning to the Cabinet as an advisory body as well as how the events and culture of the 1790s influenced the development of the executive branch. Additional resources for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: Lindsay M. Chervinsky, Ph.D., courtesy of the author, and “Henry Knox” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.16 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Allen Ayers of the Political History of the United States for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Gallatin, Albert. “II. On or before 13 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0136-0003. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 173–174.] [Last Accessed: 11 Apr 2020]
  • Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. Lafayette, LA: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 1976.
  • Henri, Florette. The Southern Indians and Benjamin Hawkins 1796-1816. Norman, OK and London: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Memorandum for Henry Dearborn on Indian Policy, 29 December 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0208. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 231–234.] [Last Accessed: 28 Mar 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Hugh Williamson, 30 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0219. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 292–293.] [Last Accessed: 6 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. ““IV. Instructions for Meriwether Lewis, 20 June 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0136-0005. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 176–183.] [Last Accessed: 12 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Meriwether Lewis, 4 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0500. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 655–656.] [Last Accessed: 12 Apr 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Mann Randolph, 5 July 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0505. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 660–662.] [Last Accessed: 12 Apr 2020]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lincoln, Levi. “III. 17 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0136-0004. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, pp. 175–176.] [Last Accessed: 11 Apr 2020]
  • Madison, James. “I. Before 13 April 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-40-02-0136-0002. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 40, 4 March–10 July 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013, p. 172.] [Last Accessed: 11 Apr 2020]
  • Madison, James. “To James Monroe, 1 May 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-04-02-0668. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 4, 8 October 1802 – 15 May 1803, ed. Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Jeanne Kerr Cross, Susan Holbrook Perdue, and Ellen J. Barber. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998, pp. 562–563.] [Last Accessed: 6 Apr 2020]
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • Owens, Robert M. Jefferson’s Hammer: William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007.
  • Snyder, Terri L. “Suicide, Slavery, and Memory in North America.” The Journal of American History. 97:1 [Jun 2010] 39-62.

Featured Image: “Portrait of Carlos Martínez de Irujo” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1804], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.16 – Up River, Down River



Content Note: This episode mentions the topic of suicide.

Year(s) Discussed: 1802-1803

As the Jefferson administration awaited word on the outcome of Monroe’s mission to France, the territorial governors and government agents in the western US dealt with various issues including labor shortages, troubled relations with neighboring indigenous nations, and the economic chaos caused by the port of New Orleans being closed to American shipping. To the east, the President and his Cabinet worked with Meriwether Lewis to prepare him for the planned transcontinental expedition as news came from across the Atlantic that would reshape the United States forever. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “William C. C. Claiborne, Governor of Louisiana” [c. early 19th century], courtesy of Wikipedia 

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band