Monthly Archives: January 2020

3.11 – Source Notes



Special thanks to James Early for reading the intro quote for this episode! Be sure to check out Presidential Fight Club, Key Battles of the Civil War, and Key Battles of the American Revolution!

  • Brighton, Ray. The Checkered Career of Tobias Lear. Portsmouth, NH: Portsmouth Marine Society, 1985.
  • Clarfield, Gerard H. Timothy Pickering and American Diplomacy 1795-1800. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 1969.
  • “Collation.” Cambridge English Dictionary. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/collation. [Last Accessed: 18 Jan 2020]
  • DeConde, Alexander. The Quasi-War: The Politics and Diplomacy of the Undeclared War with France, 1797-1801. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1966.
  • DuBois, Laurent. Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, MA and London, England, UK: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005 [2004].
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Irujo, Carlos Martínez de. “To Thomas Jefferson, 13 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0228. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 268–269.] [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]
  • Irujo, Carlos Martínez de. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 November 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0035. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, p. 50.] [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Mann Randolph, 2 November 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-38-02-0558. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 38, 1 July–12 November 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011, pp. 623–624.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jan 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Second Annual Message, 15 December 1802,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project, https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202594. [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To the Senate, 11 January 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0269. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 312–313.] [Last Accessed: 11 Jan 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To James Monroe, 13 January 1803,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-39-02-0283. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 39, 13 November 1802–3 March 1803, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012, pp. 328–331.] [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Kukla, Jon. A Wilderness So Immense: The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2003.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linden, Frank van der. The Turning Point: Jefferson’s Battle for the Presidency. Washington, DC: Robert B Luce Inc, 1962.
  • Madison, James. “To Charles Pinckney, 27 November 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-04-02-0158. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 4, 8 October 1802 – 15 May 1803, ed. Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Jeanne Kerr Cross, Susan Holbrook Perdue, and Ellen J. Barber. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1998, pp. 146–148.] [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]
  • Randolph, Thomas Mann. “To Thomas Jefferson, 29 October 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-38-02-0538. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 38, 1 July–12 November 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011, pp. 601–602.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jan 2020]
  • US Department of State. State Papers and Correspondence Bearing Upon the Purchase of the Territory of Louisiana. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1903. https://books.google.com/books?id=kiAVp1MlWs4C&lpg=PA56&ots=raAQxLDF0Z&dq=manuel%20de%20salvado&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q&f=false [Last Accessed: 30 Dec 2019]

Featured Image: “Combat et prise de la Crête-à-Pierrot (4 – 24 mars 1802)” by Auguste Raffet [c. 1839], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.11 – Making Plans for Monroe



Year(s) Discussed: 1801-1803

As continued resistance in Saint-Domingue threatens French First Consul Napoléon Bonaparte’s plans to take control of Louisiana, President Jefferson works to keep tempers cool on the domestic front while turning to a trusted ally, James Monroe, to find a permanent solution to the New Orleans situation. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Engraved BEP portrait of U.S. President James Monroe,” courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


S001 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Ben of the Thugs and Miracles podcast, Emily and Kelley of the Wining About Herstory podcast, Dan, and Alex for their contributions to this episode!

  • Arnold, Peri E. “William Taft: Campaigns and Elections.” Miller Center, University of Virginia. https://millercenter.org/president/taft/campaigns-and-elections [Last Accessed: 8 Dec 2019]
  • Chase, James S. Emergence of the Presidential Nominating Convention 1789-1832. Urbana, IL; Chicago; and London: University of Illinois Press, 1973.
  • Gould, Lewis L. Grand Old Party: A History of the Republicans. New York: Random House, 2003.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Inaugural Address [4 Mar 1801].” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/201948. [Last Accessed: 15 Dec 2019]
  • Klar, Rebecca. “Hawaii GOP cancels presidential preference poll, commits delegates to Trump.” The Hill. 12 Dec 2019. https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/474243-hawaii-gop-cancels-presidential-preference-poll-and-commits-delegates-to [Last Accessed: 4 Jan 2020]
  • Murray, Robert K. The 103rd Ballot: The Legendary 1924 Democratic Convention That Forever Changed Politics. New York: Harper & Row, 2016 [1976].
  • Pope, Michael. “A Look at How Presidential Candidates Get on Virginia’s Primary Ballot.” WVTF. 19 Dec 2019. https://www.wvtf.org/post/look-how-presidential-candidates-get-virginias-primary-ballot#stream/0 [Last Accessed: 4 Jan 2020]
  • Reagan, Ronald. “6 November 1984, Remarks at a Reelection Celebration in Los Angeles, California.” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/260741. Last Accessed: 15 Dec 2019.
  • Remini, Robert V. “Election of 1832.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers and McGraw-Hill, 1971. pp. 495-574.
  • Stevenson, Adlai. “26 Jul 1952, Acceptance Speech at Democratic National Convention.” C-SPAN. https://www.c-span.org/video/?3392-1/adlai-stevenson-1952-acceptance-speech. [Last Accessed: 15 Dec 2019]
  • Taft, William Howard. “1 Aug 1912, Remarks Accepting the Presidential Nomination of the Republican Party.” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/332424. [Last Accessed: 18 Dec 2019]
  • Tarr, David R, et al. Guide to U.S. Elections, Sixth Edition, Volume I. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010.
  • Witcover, Jules. Marathon: The Pursuit of the Presidency 1972-1976. New York: Viking Press, 1977.

Featured Image: “Photo of John F. Kennedy arriving at the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles in 1960” [13 Jul 1960], courtesy of Wikipedia


S001 – A History of Primaries



Year(s) Discussed: 1816-1976

Did you know that presidential primaries in the United States are a rather modern innovation and that for a long time, presidential primary winners often didn’t end up as the party’s nominee? Learn how the primary system came to be what it is today, the varying impacts it has had on presidential campaigns since its inception, and why it took so long to play a key role in choosing presidential nominees. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “For Auld Lang Syne” by Leonard Raven-Hill [May 1912], courtesy of Wikipedia