Monthly Archives: December 2019

3.08 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Rob and Jamie of Totalus Rankium for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Danbury Baptist Association. “To Thomas Jefferson, [after 7 October 1801],” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-35-02-0331. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 35, 1 August–30 November 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008, pp. 407–409.] [Last Accessed: 10 Nov 2019]
  • Fry, Michael, and Nathan Coleman. “To Thomas Jefferson, 17 October 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-35-02-0376. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 35, 1 August–30 November 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008, pp. 457–458.] [Last Accessed: 12 Nov 2019]
  • Hall, Kermit L. “Circuit Riding.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 145.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Michael Fry and Nathan Coleman, 22 October 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-35-02-0398. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 35, 1 August–30 November 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008, p. 486.] [Last Accessed: 12 Nov 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “V. To the Danbury Baptist Association, 1 January 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-36-02-0152-0006. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 36, 1 December 1801–3 March 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009, p. 258.] [Last Accessed: 8 Nov 2019]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • McCook, Matt. Aliens in the World: Sectarians, Secularism and the Second Great Awakening. Florida State University. 2005.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Monroe, James. “To Thomas Jefferson, 25 April 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-37-02-0265. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 37, 4 March–30 June 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010, pp. 335–337.] [Last Accessed: 17 Nov 2019]
  • Neem, Johann N. “Beyond the Wall: Reinterpreting Jefferson’s Danbury Address.” Journal of the Early Republic. 27:1 [Spring 2007] 139-154.
  • Preyer, Kathryn. “Judiciary Acts of 1801 and 1802.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 474-475.
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.
  • Sharp, James Roger. The Deadlocked Election of 1800: Jefferson, Burr, and the Union in the Balance. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2010.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • Taylor, Alan. The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia 1772-1832. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2014 [2013].
  • Turner, Kathryn. “Federalist Policy and the Judiciary Act of 1801.” The William and Mary Quarterly. 22:1 (Jan 1965) 3-32.

Featured Image: “Indicium from one cent United States postal card of 1894 depicting Thomas Jefferson” by the US Post Office Department [c. 1894], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.08 – The Enabler-in-Chief



Year(s) Discussed: 1801-1802

The Democratic-Republican reform agenda moved beyond appointments as the Seventh Congress began its session. From the federal judiciary to the organization of the west, Jefferson wielded the soft power of the presidency in order to move ideas along. However, he would not be the only one working to shape the future of the government and the nation, and there was no guarantee as to whose vision would prevail. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Map of the United States exhibiting post-roads, the situations, connections & distances of the post-offices, stage roads, counties, ports of entry and delivery for foreign vessels, and the principal rivers” by Abraham Bradley Jr [1796], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band