3.01 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Chris Flynn of the Number 10 Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Brodie, Fawn M. Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History. New York: Bantam Books, 1985 [1974].
  • Cunningham, Noble E., Jr. In Pursuit of Reason: The Life of Thomas Jefferson. New York: Ballantine Books, 1988 [1987].
  • Gordon-Reed, Annette, and Peter Onuf. “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination. New York and London: Liveright Publishing, 2016.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Harvie, 14 January 1760,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-01-02-0001. Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 1, 1760–1776, ed. Julian P. Boyd. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1950, p. 3.] [Last Accessed: 2 Jul 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Jefferson Randolph, 24 November 1808,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-9151. [Last Accessed: 24 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William W. Hening, 25 July 1809,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/03-01-02-0305. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series, vol. 1, 4 March 1809 to 15 November 1809, ed. J. Jefferson Looney. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004, pp. 369–370.] [Last Accessed: 3 Jul 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Thomas Jefferson: Autobiography, 6 Jan.-29 July 1821, 6 January 1821,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/98-01-02-1756. [Last Accessed: 24 Jun 2019]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the Virginian: Jefferson and His Time, Volume One. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1948.
  • Meacham, Jon. Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power. New York: Random House, 2012.
  • Peterson, Merrill D, ed. The Portable Thomas Jefferson. New York: Penguin Books, 1977.

Featured Image: “George Wythe, Signer of the Declaration of Independence” by James Barton Longacre, courtesy of Wikipedia


3.01 – Jefferson Pre-Presidency Part One



Year(s) Discussed: 1612-1774

From his birth in Albemarle County, VA, Thomas Jefferson’s personality and public career began to take shape through his education at William and Mary, and his introduction to the world of politics in colonial Virginia. Along the way, he would be influenced by family members and mentors and would in turn start to impact his own young family, his neighbors, those individuals he enslaved, and the course of events in British North America. Sources used in this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Rebuilt Wren building with Italianate towers c. 1859” [1875], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.26 – Source Notes



Alcoholism/Substance Abuse Treatment Resources

Suicide Prevention Resources

Sources referenced for this episode:

  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 17 February 1786,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/06-18-02-0083. [Original source: The Adams Papers, Papers of John Adams, vol. 18, December 1785–January 1787, ed. Gregg L. Lint, Sara Martin, C. James Taylor, Sara Georgini, Hobson Woodward, Sara B. Sikes, Amanda M. Norton. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016, pp. 165–167.] [Last Accessed: 6 Aug 2019]
  • Cappon, Lester J, ed. The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams. Chapel Hill, NC and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1987 [1959].
  • Ferling, John. John Adams: A Life. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 [1992].
  • Lambert, Frank. The Barbary Wars: American Independence in the Atlantic World. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007 [2005].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.

Images used for this episode:

  • “The Ajax, a Man of War, sailing into Portsmouth Harbour, with a View of South Sea Castle” by Carington Bowles [1783] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Ajax,_a_Man_of_War,_sailing_into_Portsmouth_Harbour,_with_a_View_of_South_Sea_Castle_NMM_PU7566_(cropped).jpg
  • “Interior of the Great Hall on the Binnenhof in The Hague, during the Great Assembly of the States-General in 1651,” attributed to Bartholomeus van Bassen and Anthonie Palamedes [c. 1651-1652] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Great_Assembly_of_the_States-General_in_1651_01.jpg
  • “American Commissioners of the Preliminary Peace Agreement with Great Britain (unfinished oil sketch)” by Benjamin West [c. 1783-1784] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Treaty_of_Paris_by_Benjamin_West_1783.jpg
  • “Dam square, Amsterdam” by Gerrit Adriaenszoon Berckheyde [c. late 17th century] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AmsterdamDamsquar.jpg
  • “George Washington” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1795-1796] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Washington_by_Gilbert_Stuart,_1795-96.png
  • “Barbaria” by Jan Janssonius [c. 1650] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Atlas_Van_der_Hagen-KW1049B13_057-BARBARIA.jpeg
  • “Official Presidential Portrait of Thomas Jefferson” by Rembrandt Peale [c. 1800] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Official_Presidential_portrait_of_Thomas_Jefferson_(by_Rembrandt_Peale,_1800).jpg
  • “John Adams” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1800-1815] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams,_Gilbert_Stuart,_c1800_1815.jpg
  • “Official Presidential Portrait of John Adams” by John Trumbull [c. 1792-1793] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Official_Presidential_portrait_of_John_Adams_(by_John_Trumbull,_circa_1792).jpg
  • “Thomas Jefferson” by John Trumbull [c. 1788] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Jefferson_by_John_Trumbull_1788.jpg
  • “John Adams” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1791-1794] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams_-_by_Charles_Willson_Peale.jpg
  • “Thomas Pinckney” by John Trumbull (original); WC Armstrong (engraving) [] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Pinckney.jpg
  • “Portrait of John Adams” by Eliphalet Frazer Andrews [1881] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams_reverse_image_by_Andrews.jpg
  • “Portrait of John Adams” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1815] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:jadams.jpg
  • “Oliver Wolcott Jr” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1820] https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Oliver_Wolcott_Jr_by_Gilbert_Stuart_circa_1820.jpeg
  • “Alexander Hamilton” by William J Weaver https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alexander_Hamilton_By_William_J_Weaver.jpg
  • “Portrait of President John Adams” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1821] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams_-_by_Gilbert_Stuart_-_c_1821_-_Natl_Portrait_Gallery_Washington_DC.jpg
  • “Portrait of George Washington Adams, son of John Quincy Adams” by Charles Bird King [c. 1820] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Washington_Adams.jpg
  • “John Quincy Adams” by George Peter Alexander Healy [1858] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Quincy_Adams_by_GPA_Healy,_1858.jpg
  • “John Adams II, son of President John Quincy Adams” by unknown [c. 1820] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Adams_II.jpg
  • “John Quincy Adams” by Gilbert Stuart [1818] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:635px-Gilbert_Stuart_-_John_Quincy_Adams_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

 


2.26 – Adams Q&A



Year(s) Discussed: 1735-1848

I asked for your questions to wrap up our series on the second POTUS, and you sent in some great ones! In this episode, we discuss everything from Adams’s tenure as US Minister to the Netherlands to his relationship with his family members to his and JQA’s legacies to what kind of food he liked. Thanks to everyone who sent in questions! For those listening through a podcatcher, my apologies for the audio quality – I recorded it as a video and had to add in alternate audio later as I referenced what would be shown on the screen. If you’d like to watch the video instead, it’s available at https://vimeo.com/presidencies/2-26-adams-qa.

Sources used for this episode as well as other resources referenced can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Bust of John Adams from the Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection” by Daniel Chester French [c. 1890], courtesy of Wikipedia


V004 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Zach for sharing his time and insight with us! To learn more about Zach’s work on Elias Polk:

  • “James K Polk: Ancestry, Politics, & Policies.” C-SPAN. 12 Apr 2019. https://www.c-span.org/video/?459435-3/james-k-polk-ancestry-politics-policies
  • Kinslow, Zacharie. “Enslaved and Entrenched: The Complex Life of Elias Polk.” White House Historical Association. 2018. https://www.whitehousehistory.org/enslaved-and-entrenched

Images Used in the Video:

  • “Zacharie Kinslow” (3 photos) courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “Elias Polk“, illustration originally from the Daily American newspaper in Elias Polk’s obituary announcement, 31 Dec 1886, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elias_Polk.jpg
  • “James Knox Polk” by George Peter Alexander Healy [Oct 1858] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_Knox_Polk_by_GPA_Healy,_1858.jpg
  • “Portrait of Mrs. James K Polk” by George Dury after George Peter Alexander Healy [1883] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Polk_sarah.jpg
  • “Daguerreotype of Dolley Madison” by Mathew Brady [1848] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Daguerreotype_of_Dolley_Madison.jpg
  • “A gathering on the South Portico of the White House of President Polk, Dolley Madison, and James Buchanan” by John Plumbe Jr [1848] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dolly_MAdison.jpg
  • “Paul Jennings” [pre-1874] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Paul_Jennings.jpg
  • “Polk/Dallas Campaign Banner” by Nathaniel Currier firm [1844] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Polk_Dallas_campaign_banner.jpg
  • “James Knox Polk” by George Peter Alexander Healy [1846] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:JamesKnoxPolk.png
  • “John Quincy Adams” [c. 1855-1865 (copy)] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:John_Q._Adams.jpg
  • “Oil on canvas portrait of Henry Clay” by Henry F Darby [1858] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clay_portrait.jpg
  • “Andrew Jackson” by Thomas Scully [1824] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Andrew_Jackson.jpg
  • “Lithograph of Andrew Jackson destroying the Second Bank of the United States” by Edward W Clay [c. 1832-1833] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1832bank1.jpg
  • “A portrait of New York Governor and US President Martin Van Buren” by Daniel Huntington [c. late 19th/early 20th century] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MVanBuren.png
  • “James K Polk” [c. 1846], courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “James K Polk” [c. 1849], courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “New Orleans lithograph from 1852” by J W Hill & Smith [1852] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_Orleans_lithograph_from_1852.jpg
  • “The Polk House,” courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “Grundy Place” [pre-1845] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GrundyPlace.jpg
  • “Hernán Cortés” (portrait given to James K Polk), courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “The Death of James K Polk,” courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow
  • “James and Sarah Polk” [1848-1849] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_K_Polk_and_Sarah_C_Polk.jpg
  • “Sarah Childress Polk” by George Dury [1875] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sarahdurry.gif.jpg
  • “Portrait of Thomas Morris Chester, taken in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania circa 1870” by David C Burnite [1870] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Morris_Chester.jpg
  • “Frederick Douglass” by George Kendall Warren [1879] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frederick_Douglass_(circa_1879).jpg

Featured Images: “James Knox Polk” by George Peter Alexander Healy [Oct 1858] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_Knox_Polk_by_GPA_Healy,_1858.jpg and “Portrait of Mrs. James K Polk” by George Dury after George Peter Alexander Healy [1883] https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Polk_sarah.jpg


V004 – Interview with Zacharie Kinslow



Year(s) Discussed: 1795-1891

On the anniversary of James K Polk’s death, I spoke with Zacharie Kinslow of the President James K Polk Home and Museum in Columbia, TN about the 11th President and his wife Sarah Childress Polk. Zach also shares his research on the life of Elias Polk, an enslaved individual whose life after attaining freedom following the Civil War provides insight into life for African-Americans in the Reconstruction Era and the Gilded Age. Images used for this episode as well as links to Zach’s article on Elias and video of a presentation at a conference on Polk can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: “Zacharie Kinslow” and “Elias Polk”, courtesy of Zacharie Kinslow


2.25 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Alex for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Adams, Abigail. “To Thomas Boylston Adams, 12 July 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0990. [Last Accessed: 9 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 May 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-1268. [Last Accessed: 16 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail. “To Thomas Jefferson, 25 October 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-0540. [Last Accessed: 16 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail. “To James Madison, 1 August 1810,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-1838. [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Cotton Tufts, 26 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0827. [Last Accessed: 9 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Benjamin Stoddert, 31 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4900. [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 24 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0365. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 426.] [Last Accessed: 9 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To William Cranch, 23 May 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0969. [Last Accessed: 23 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Benjamin Rush, 6 February 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-5067. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Mercy Otis Warren, 11 July 1807,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-5193. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Mercy Otis Warren, 30 July 1807,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-5199. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Benjamin Rush, 13 October 1811,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-5695. [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 1 January 1812,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/03-04-02-0296-0002. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series, vol. 4, 18 June 1811 to 30 April 1812, ed. J. Jefferson Looney. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 390–391.] [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 16 August 1813,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-6132. [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To John Quincy Adams, 18 March 1815,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-2809. [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 October 1818,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-7017. [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Cappon, Lester J, ed. The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence between Thomas Jefferson and Abigail and John Adams. Chapel Hill, NC and London: University of North Carolina Press, 1987 [1959].
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Ellis, Joseph J. Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2001 [1993].
  • Ferling, John. John Adams: A Life. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 [1992].
  • Holton, Woody. Abigail Adams. New York and London: Free Press, 2009.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Adams, 8 March 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0171. Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, p. 213.] [Last Accessed: 9 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Abigail Smith Adams, 13 June 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-1280. [Last Accessed: 16 Jun 2019]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2018-2019. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Madison, James. “To John Quincy Adams, 16 October 1810,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/03-02-02-0735. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Presidential Series, vol. 2, 1 October 1809–2 November 1810, ed. J. C. A. Stagg, Jeanne Kerr Cross, and Susan Holbrook Perdue. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1992, pp. 582–583.] [Last Accessed: 22 Jun 2019]
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • McCullough, David. John Adams. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001.
  • Nagel, Paul C. John Quincy Adams: A Public Life, a Private Life. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1997.
  • Smith, Page. John Adams, Volume II 1784-1826. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co, 1962.
  • Warren, Mercy Otis. “To John Adams, 28 July 1807,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-5198. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2019]
  • Withey, Lynne. Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams. New York & London: Simon & Schuster, 2002 [1981].

Featured Image: “Benjamin Rush” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1818], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.25 – Adams Post-Presidency



Year(s) Discussed: 1801-1826

After leaving the presidency, John Adams searched for a path ahead. In the process, he dealt with emotions that had been building for years, rebuilt some bridges that had been burned in political battles, suffered numerous personal heartaches, and bore witness to a quarter century more of the nation’s history. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Portrait of John Adams” by Samuel Morse [c. 1816], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.24 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Shawn Warswick of the American History Podcast, Gary Girod of the French History Podcast, and Sam Hume of Pax Britannica for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 8 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0807. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 15 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0856. [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, Abigail Smith. “To Mary Smith Cranch, 7 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0885. [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Elbridge Gerry, 30 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4732. [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Boylston Adams, 17 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0817. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To John Jay, 19 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4718. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Samuel Dexter, 2 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4742. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 February 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-33-02-0020. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 33, 17 February–30 April 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006, pp. 23–24.] [Last Accessed: 8 Jun 2019]
  • Adams, John. “To Christopher Gadsden, 16 April 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4907. [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Adams, Thomas Boylston. “To John Adams, 14 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-03-02-0811. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Brown, Ralph Adams. The Presidency of John Adams. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1989 [1975].
  • Burr, Aaron. “To Thomas Jefferson, 23 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0239. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 342–343.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jun 2019]
  • Cassell, Frank A. Merchant Congressman in the Young Republic: Samuel Smith of Maryland, 1752-1839. Madison, WI; Milwaukee, WI; and London: University of Wisconsin Press, 1971.
  • Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.
  • Cullen, Charles T, ed. The Papers of John Marshall, Volume IV: Correspondence and Papers, January 1799-October 1800. Chapel Hill, NC and Williamsburg, VA: University of North Carolina Press and Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1984.
  • Cunningham, Noble E, Jr. “Election of 1800.” History of American Presidential Elections 1789-1968, Volume I. Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1971. 101-134.
  • DeConde, Alexander. The Quasi-War: The Politics and Diplomacy of the Undeclared War with France, 1797-1801. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1966.
  • Dexter, Samuel. “To John Adams, 3 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4702. [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.
  • Ellis, Joseph J. Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2001 [1993].
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Theodore Sedgwick, 10 May 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-24-02-0387. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 24, November 1799 – June 1800, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1976, pp. 474–475.] [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Hamilton, Alexander. “To Oliver Wolcott, Junior, 16 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-25-02-0131. [Original source: The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, vol. 25, July 1800 – April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977, pp. 257–259.] [Last Accessed: 4 Jun 2019]
  • Jay, John. “To John Adams, 2 January 1801,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Adams/99-02-02-4745. [Last Accessed: 6 Jun 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Mann Randolph, 12 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0202. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, p. 300.] [Last Accessed: 24 May 2019]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Aaron Burr, 15 December 1800,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed April 11, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-32-02-0208. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 32, 1 June 1800 – 16 February 1801, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005, pp. 306–307.] [Last Accessed: 5 Jun 2019]
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Featured Image: “Thomas McKean” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1797], courtesy of Wikipedia


2.24 – The 36th Ballot



Year(s) Discussed: 1800-1801

The nation had little time to process the news that Adams was defeated in his bid for reelection as a constitutional crisis developed regarding who would succeed him to the post. Meanwhile, the outgoing president only had a few weeks remaining to secure the ratification of the Convention of Mortefontaine, get several federal judges confirmed including a new Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and get a new Treasury Secretary in place. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Front View of the President’s House, in the City of Washington” [c.1807], courtesy of Wikipedia