SATT 001 – Alexander Hamilton



Tenure of Office: 11 September 1789 – 31 January 1795 (Secretary of the Treasury)

We begin our new special series with the first Cabinet member to assume office under the constitutional government – Alexander Hamilton! You may have seen the musical, but there are a few more parts of his history that didn’t make it into that production.

Thanks so much to my special guest for this episode – Alycia from the Civics & Coffee Podcast!

Featured Image: “Alexander Hamilton” by John Trumbull [c. 1805], courtesy of Wikipedia


SATT – Intro to Ongoing Special Series



Introduction to a new special series of episodes titled “Seat at the Table” where I will be joined by special guests each episode to discuss a Cabinet member’s life and tenure in office and rank how they did before determining if they deserve a seat at the table of Cabinet All-Stars.

Featured Images: “Alexander Hamilton” by John Trumbull [c. 1805], courtesy of Wikipedia; “Hamilton Fish” by Mathew Brady, courtesy of Wikipedia; “Frances Perkins” [c. 1932], courtesy of Wikipedia; and “Jesse Brown,” courtesy of Wikipedia


3.32 – Source Notes



Special thanks to John for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Andrew Pfannkuche for providing audio editing assistance for this episode!

  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. ““To Thomas Jefferson, 10 January 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2980. [Last Accessed: 19 Jun 2021]
  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. “To Thomas Jefferson, 10 February 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3210. [Last Accessed: 19 Jun 2021]
  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. “To Thomas Jefferson, 14 July 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4028. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Fenster, Julie M. Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation. New York: Broadway Books, 2016.
  • Hart, Stephen Harding; and Archer Butler Hulbert, eds. The Southwestern Journals of Zebulon Pike, 1806-1807. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2007.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Joseph Hamilton Daveiss, 15 February 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3242. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Proclamation re Henry Whitby, 3 May 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3682. [Last Accessed: 14 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William DuVal, 14 June 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3844. [Last Accessed: 11 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Armistead Burwell, 17 September 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4285. [Last Accessed: 18 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To George Morgan, 19 September 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4294. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Johnson, David. John Randolph of Roanoke. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lewis, James E, Jr. The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2017.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Meacham, Jon. Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power. New York: Random House, 2012.
  • Orsi, Jared. Citizen Explorer: The Life of Zebulon Pike. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Featured Image: “Charles James Fox” by Anton Hinkel [c. 1794], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.32 – Time Draws Short



Year(s) Discussed: 1805-1806

As Jefferson reflects upon the unexpected death of his mentor, various situations at home and abroad in 1806 imperil the future of the nation. A British ship unintentionally kills an American sailor, threatening the peace negotiations being conducted in London. Around the same time, expeditions to explore the west provoke Spanish forces already gathered on the border. Meanwhile, the President receives word of a domestic plot involving not only the former Vice President but also the commanding general of the US Army. Sources used in this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Map of the 1806 Red River Expedition” by Nich. King [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.31 – Source Notes



Special thanks to James Early of the Key Battles of American History podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode. Special thanks also to Andrew Pfannkuche for his audio editing work on this episode.

  • Bemis, Samuel Flagg. John Quincy Adams and the Foundations of American Foreign Policy. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 1956.
  • “Bidwell, Barnabas, 1763-1833.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000446. [Last Accessed: 23 May 2021]
  • Cassell, Frank A. Merchant Congressman in the Young Republic: Samuel Smith of Maryland, 1752-1839. Madison, WI; Milwaukee, WI; and London: University of Wisconsin Press, 1971.
  • Célius, Carlo. “Neoclassicism and the Haitian Revolution.” The World of the Haitian Revolution. David Patrick Geggus & Norman Fiering, eds. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2009. pp. 352-392.
  • DuBois, Laurent. Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, MA and London, England, UK: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005 [2004].
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Girard, Philippe R. “Jean-Jacques Dessalines and the Atlantic System: A Reappraisal.” The William and Mary Quarterly. 69:3 [July 2012] 549-582.
  • Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. Lafayette, LA: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 1976.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To United States Congress, 6 December 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2779. [Last Accessed: 11 May 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Mann Randolph, 13 July 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4026. [Last Accessed: 10 Jun 2021]
  • Johnson, David. John Randolph of Roanoke. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
  • Ketcham, Ralph. James Madison: A Biography. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1994 [1971].
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1982.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • McMichael, Andrew. Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida 1785-1810. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2008.
  • Perkins, Bradford. Prologue to War, 1805-1812: England and the United States. Berkeley, CA; Los Angeles, CA; and London: University of California Press, 1974 (1961)
  • Stewart, David O. American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.
  • Thorning, Joseph F. Miranda: World Citizen. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida Press, 1967.

Featured Image: “Thomas Mann Randolph” [c. 1790], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.31 – Waves on the Horizon



Year(s) Discussed: 1804-1806

As tensions between the US and Spain increase over West Florida and the border with Tejas, Aaron Burr travels to the west and back again to meet with folks across the nation as his plot progresses. Meanwhile, supporters of Jefferson in Congress attempt to move against Rep. John Randolph of Roanoke, and a House Ways and Means Committee meeting gets so raucous that a duel seems to be in the making. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “A new chart of the Atlantic or Western Ocean” by William Heather [c. 1797], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.30 – The Tide in Europe



Year(s) Discussed: 1804-1806

The Napoleonic Wars continue apace in Europe as Napoleon plots an invasion of Britain, and Admiral Horatio Nelson searches for the French fleet in the Mediterranean. As battles continue on land and sea across the continent, American diplomats in London, Paris, and Madrid continue their work. Meanwhile, the untimely death of a key leader opens up opportunities for the US to negotiate a treaty. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “The Battle of Trafalgar” by J M W Turner [c. 1822-1824], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.30 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Alex for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Andrew for his audio editing assistance!

  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Dangerfield, George. Chancellor Robert R. Livingston of New York, 1746-1813. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co, 1960.
  • Ehrman, John. The Younger Pitt Volume III: The Consuming Struggle. London: Constable & Co, 1996.
  • Esdaile, Charles. Napoleon’s Wars: An International History. New York: Penguin, 2009 [2007].
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Thomas Lomax, 11 January 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2995. [Last Accessed: 5 Apr 2021]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Leonard, Dick. A History of British Prime Ministers: Walpole to Cameron, Omnibus Edition. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 [2014].
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • Matthews, Marty D. Forgotten Founder: The Life and Times of Charles Pinckney. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2004.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Monroe, James. “To Thomas Jefferson, 6 October 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2442. [Last Accessed: 4 May 2021]
  • Schom, Alan. Napoleon Bonaparte. New York: HarperCollins, 1998 [1997].

Featured Image: “La bataille d’Austerlitz. 2 decembre 1805″ by François Gérard [c. 1810], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.29 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Alycia from the Civics & Coffee podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode, and thanks so much to our audio editor, Andrew Pfannkuche, for his work on this episode!

  • Allgor, Catherine. A Perfect Union: Dolley Madison and the Creation of the American Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 2006.
  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Ammon, Harry. James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1971].
  • Armstrong, Thom M. Politics, Diplomacy and Intrigue in the Early Republic: The Cabinet Career of Robert Smith 1801-1811. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co, 1991.
  • “Breckinridge, John, 1760-1806.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/B000787. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Crowninshield, Jacob. “To Thomas Jefferson, 27 March 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1452. [Last Accessed: 28 Mar 2021]
  • “Dayton, Jonathan, 1760-1824.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/D000165. [Last Accessed: 24 Mar 2021]
  • Einboden, Jeffrey. Jefferson’s Muslim Fugitives: The Lost Story of Enslaved Africans, Their Arabic Letters, and an American President. New York: Oxford University Press, 2020.
  • Gaines, William H, Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph: Jefferson’s Son-in-Law. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To United States Senate, 26 February 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1237. [Last Accessed: 28 Mar 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Albert Gallatin, 29 May 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1800. [Last Accessed: 2 Apr 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Julius Pringle, 15 June 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1906. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on a Cabinet Meeting, 8 July 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2047. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To John Breckinridge, 7 August 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2202. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lewis, James E, Jr. The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2017.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1982.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • Mason, John. “To Thomas Jefferson, 20 July 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2117. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Matthews, Marty D. Forgotten Founder: The Life and Times of Charles Pinckney. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2004.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Miles, Tiya. The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits. New York and London: The New Press, 2019 [2017].
  • Monroe, James. “To Thomas Jefferson, 1 November 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2559. [Last Accessed: 14 Mar 2021]
  • Monroe, James, and Charles Pinckney. “To James Madison, 25 May 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/02-09-02-0446. [Original source: The Papers of James Madison, Secretary of State Series, vol. 9, 1 February 1805–30 June 1805, ed. Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Anne Mandeville Colony, Angela Kreider, and Katherine E. Harbury. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, pp. 398–401.] [Last Accessed: 18 Mar 2021]
  • Pringle, John J. “To George Washington, 3 September 1792,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/05-11-02-0034. [Original source: The Papers of George Washington, Presidential Series, vol. 11, 16 August 1792 – 15 January 1793, ed. Christine Sternberg Patrick. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2002, p. 68.] [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Pringle, John Julius. “To Thomas Jefferson, 2 July 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2013. [Last Accessed: 30 Mar 2021]
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821.New York: Harper & Row, 1977.
  • Seale, William. The President’s House: A History, Volume One. Washington, DC: White House Historical Association, 1986.

Featured Images: “Margaret Bayard Smith” by Charles Bird King [c. 1829], courtesy of Wikipedia and “Hammouda Pacha, bey de Tunis” [c. 1800], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.29 – A Winter to Remember



Year(s) Discussed: 1804-1805

President Jefferson had much to celebrate in the latter half of 1805 as he finally secured a new Attorney General, envoys arrived from distant lands in the east and the west, and his daughter and her family joined him in the President’s House for the winter. Little did he know, though, that difficult negotiations in Madrid and the machinations of the former Vice President, Aaron Burr, would soon lead to difficulties for his administration. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: “Tchong-tas-sáb-bee, Black Dog, Second Chief” by George Catlin [c. 1834], courtesy of Wikipedia and “John Breckinridge” [c. 1891], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band