Intelligent Speech Conference 2021



I’m excited to share that I will be presenting at the Intelligent Speech Conference on Saturday, April 24th, 2021! If you would like to attend, please take a moment to listen to this quick trailer for more information, go to www.intelligentspeechconference.com, and use the promo code “presi” to get 10% off your ticket to 24 hours of content available on 4 simultaneous streams. It should be a great experience, so I hope you’ll join us!


3.27 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Roderick Aust for providing the intro quote for this episode, and be sure to check out the Zoom Shakespeare Company on Facebook! Special thanks also to our audio editor, Andrew Pfannkuche, for his work on this episode!

Featured Image: “Jacob Crowninshield” by Robert Cutler Hinckley [c. 1921], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.27 – Second Term, Same as the Worst



Year(s) Discussed: 1803-1805

Jefferson’s second inauguration may have been a non-event, but on numerous fronts, various tensions were building in early 1805 that threatened to make his second term one to remember. Cabinet members plotted to further their own ambitions while Aaron Burr schemed with foreign powers and domestic discontents in order to return to prominence. Meanwhile, unbeknownst to the president, one of his appointments would put a double agent in place to potentially break the recently acquired Louisiana Purchase away from the US. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Thomas Jefferson” by Matthew Harris Jouett, courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.235 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Alex for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Fenster, Julie M. Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation. New York: Broadway Books, 2016.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 24 June 1799,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-31-02-0120. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 31, 1 February 1799 – 31 May 1800, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004, pp. 137–139.] [Last Accessed: 2 Feb 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 13 March 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0009. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 9–13.] [Last Accessed: 3 Feb 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Dunbar, 15 April 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-43-02-0209. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 43, 11 March–30 June 1804, ed. James P. McClure. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2017, pp. 242–243.] [Last Accessed: 3 Feb 2021]
  • “MITCHILL, Samuel Latham.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/M000831. [Last Accessed: 2 Feb 2021]
  • Treuer, Anton. Atlas of Indian Nations. Washington, DC: National Geographic, 2013.

Featured Image: “William Dunbar” [c. 1800], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.235 – A Western Interlude



Year(s) Discussed: 1804-1805

With the Lewis and Clark expedition underway to explore the upper reaches of the Missouri River, President Jefferson at the end of his first term turned his attention to gathering support and talent for expeditions in the southern portions of the Louisiana Purchase. Meanwhile, the Corps of Discovery arranged for Jefferson to get a first-hand account of life west of the Mississippi River. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Carte Du Mexique et des Pays Limitrophes Situes Au Nord et a l’est Dressee d’apres la Grande Carte de la Nouvelle Espagne De Mr. A. De Humboldt” by Alexander von Humboldt [c. 1811], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.26 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Countryboi of One Mic: Black History Podcast for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Andrew Pfannkuche for his audio editing assistance with this episode!

  • Brodie, Fawn M. Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History. New York: Bantam Books, 1985 [1974].
  • Gordon-Reed, Annette. The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. New York and London: W W Norton & Co, 2008.
  • Hemings, Madison. “Life among the Lowly, No. 1.” Pike County (Ohio) Republican. 13 Mar 1873. Reprinted in Sally Hemings & Thomas Jefferson: History, Memory, and Civic Culture. Jan Ellen Lewis and Peter S. Onuf, eds. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1999 [1999].
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Francis Eppes, 30 August 1785,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-15-02-0597. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 15, 27 March 1789 – 30 November 1789, ed. Julian P. Boyd. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1958, pp. 621–623.] [Last Accessed: 2 Jan 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Martha Jefferson Randolph, 21 January 1805,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-1020. [Last Accessed: 30 Nov 2020]
  • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the Virginian: Jefferson and His Time, Volume One. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1948.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Miller, John Chester. The Wolf by the Ears: Thomas Jefferson and Slavery. Charlottesville, VA and London: University Press of Virginia, 1991 [1977].
  • Sublette, Ned, and Constance Sublette. The American Slave Coast: A History of the Slave-Breeding Industry. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2016.

Additional information on the Hemings family can be found at the Monticello website.

Featured Image: “Col. John Wayles Jefferson of the Union Army, son of Eston Hemings,” courtesy of Wikipedia


3.26 – Present but Absent: The Hemings Family of Monticello



Year(s) Discussed: 1735-1873

Throughout Jefferson’s life and career, he was surrounded and served by various enslaved individuals of three generations of the same family. In this episode, we examine the lives of the Hemings family as some worked to attain their freedom, other Hemingses disappeared from the historical record without a trace, and one became the most famous enslaved individual in the United States for bearing the third President’s children. Sources used for this episode can be found at https://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “View of the West Front of Monticello and Garden” by Jane Braddock [c. 1825], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


S008 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Andrew Pfannkuche for this audio editing assistance and to Dave Broker of the Industrial Revolutions Podcast, Kenny Ryan of the [Abridged] Presidential Histories podcast, and my husband Alex for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Chernow, Ron. Grant. New York: Penguin Press, 2017.
  • CQ Press. Guide to U.S. Elections, Fifth Edition, Volume II. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2005.
  • Flick, Alexander Clarence. Samuel Jones Tilden: A Study in Political Sagacity. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1963 [1939].
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2006 [2005].
  • Hancock, Almira R. Reminiscences of Winfield Scott Hancock. New York: Charles L Webster & Co, 1887.
  • Holt, Michael F. By One Vote: The Disputed Presidential Election of 1876. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2008.
  • Hoogenboom, Ari. Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior & President. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1995.
  • Jordan, David M. Winfield Scott Hancock: A Soldier’s Life. Bloomington, IN and Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996 [1988].
  • McFeely, William S. Grant: A Biography. New York and London: WW Norton & Co, 1982 [1981].
  • McGuiness, Colleen, ed. American Leaders 1789-1994: A Biographical Summary. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994.
  • McPherson, James M. Ordeal by Fire: The Civil War and Reconstruction, Third Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2001 [1982].
  • Morris, Roy, Jr. Fraud of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and the Stolen Election of 1876. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003.
  • Muzzey, David Saville. James G. Blaine: A Political Idol of Other Days. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat Press, 1963 [1934].
  • Nevins, Allan. Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration. New York: Dodd, Mead & Co, 1936.
  • Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. “Party Divisions of the House of Representatives, 1789 to Present.” United States House of Representatives. https://history.house.gov/Institution/Party-Divisions/Party-Divisions/. [Last Accessed: 24 Nov 2020]
  • Smith, Jean Edward. Grant. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001.
  • Tarr, David R, et al. Guide to U.S. Elections, Sixth Edition, Volume I. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2010.
  • Urofsky, Melvin I. A March of Liberty: A Constitutional History of the United States, Volume I: To 1877. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988.
  • Van Deusen, Glyndon G. Horace Greeley: Nineteenth-Century Crusader. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1953.
  • Williams, T Harry, ed. Hayes: The Diary of a President, 1875-1881. New York: David McKay Co Inc, 1964.
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats. New York: Random House, 2003.

Featured Image: “The Florida Case before the Electoral Commission” by Cornelia Adèle Strong Fassett, courtesy of Wikipedia


S008 – Transition Gone Wrong



Year(s) Discussed: 1875-1877

Though the US takes pride in the regular practice of peaceful transitions of power from one presidency to the next, sometimes the transition is not quite so peaceful, especially when the results are in dispute. Such was the case in the aftermath of the presidential election of 1876 where, for months, allegations flew back and forth, political leaders across the nation exerted their influence in favor of their chosen candidate, members of both parties prepared for armed confrontation, and no one could predict whether Samuel J Tilden or Rutherford B Hayes would end up being the nineteenth president of the United States. Source notes for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Images: “Rutherford B Hayes” [c. 1865-1880], courtesy of Wikipedia and “Samuel Jones Tilden” [c. 1860-1886], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.25 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Howard and Jess from Plodding Through the Presidents for providing the intro quote for this episode!

  • “Certificate of Sale and Manumission of John Freeman, 23 July 1804,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-0131. [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Fourth Annual Message, 8 November 1804,” Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/node/202713. [Last Accessed: 10 Nov 2020]
  • Johnson, David. John Randolph of Roanoke. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
  • Johnson, Herbert A. The Chief Justiceship of John Marshall, 1801-1835. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1997.
  • Kirk, Russell. John Randolph of Roanoke: A Study in American Politics, With Selected Speeches and Letters, Fourth Edition. Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund, 1997 [1951].
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2020. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Years from Princeton to Vice President 1756-1805. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1979.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President First Term, 1801-1805: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Four. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1970.
  • Matthews, Marty D. Forgotten Founder: The Life and Times of Charles Pinckney. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2004.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Paul, Joel Richard. Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times. New York: Riverhead Books, 2018.
  • Presser, Stephen B. “Chase, Samuel.” The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. Kermit L Hall, ed. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. p. 137-139.
  • Smith, Jean Edward. John Marshall: Definer of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1996.
  • “TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1804, 4 o’clock, P. M.” Senate Journal. Library of Congress. https://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(sj003516)). [Last Accessed: 7 Nov 2020]

Featured Image: “Areas involved in the Yazoo-Georgia land scandal” [c. 1915], courtesy of Wikipedia