3.35 – Source Notes



Special thanks to my husband Alex for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Alex Van Rose for his audio editing work on this episode!

  • Dougan, Michael B. “Livingston, Henry Brockholst.” Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. pp. 507-508.
  • Ellis, Richard E. “Paterson, William.” Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. pp. 624-625.
  • Fenster, Julie M. Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation. New York: Broadway Books, 2016.
  • Gaudioso, Peter. “Thomas Todd.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 76-80.
  • Harrison, Lowell H. John Breckinridge: Jeffersonian Republican. Louisville, KY: The Filson Club, 1969.
  • Hart, Stephen Harding; and Archer Butler Hulbert, eds. The Southwestern Journals of Zebulon Pike, 1806-1807. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2007.
  • HIckox, Charles F, III; and Andrew C Laviano. “William Paterson.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 36-40.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Caesar A. Rodney, 24 April 1802,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-37-02-0261. [Original source: The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 37, 4 March–30 June 1802, ed. Barbara B. Oberg. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010, pp. 330–331.] [Last Accessed: 19 Aug 2021]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Leonard, Dick. A History of British Prime Ministers: Walpole to Cameron, Omnibus Edition. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 [2014].
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • Masterson, William H. Tories and Democrats: British Diplomats in Pre-Jacksonian America. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1985.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Orsi, Jared. Citizen Explorer: The Life of Zebulon Pike. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • Perkins, Bradford. Prologue to War, 1805-1812: England and the United States. Berkeley, CA; Los Angeles, CA; and London: University of California Press, 1974 (1961)
  • “Rodney, Caesar Augustus.” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. https://bioguide.congress.gov/search/bio/R000377. [Last Accessed: 19 Aug 2021]
  • Shurtleff, Kathleen. “Henry Brockholst Livingston.” The Supreme Court Justices: Illustrated Biographies, 1789-1995, Second Edition. Clare Cushman, ed. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Inc, 1995. p. 71-75.
  • Tachau, Mary K Bonsteel. “Todd, Thomas.” Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. pp. 876.
  • Tucker, Spencer C.; and Frank T. Reuter. Injured Honor: The Chesapeake-Leopard Affair, June 22, 1807. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1996.

Featured Image: “John Adair” by Nicola Marschall [c. 1908], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.35 – And Everything Else



Year(s) Discussed: 1806-1807

Concurrent with the events of the Burr conspiracy, the Jefferson administration and its agents were engaged in other work on multiple fronts. Lt. Zebulon Pike was leading an expedition westward while Gen. James Wilkinson took questionable measures in the name of national security in New Orleans. In London, James Monroe and William Pinkney worked against all odds to finalize a treaty with Great Britain. Meanwhile, the President had to decide upon a new Attorney General as well as not one but two Supreme Court justices. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Zebulon Pike” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1808], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


3.34 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Jacob from the Podcast on Germany and listener Brian for providing the intro quotes for this episode!

  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lewis, James E, Jr. The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2017.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Lomask, Milton. Aaron Burr: The Conspiracy and Years of Exile, 1805-1836. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1982.
  • Remini, Robert V. Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821.New York: Harper & Row, 1977.
  • Stewart, David O. American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.
  • Tiffin, Edward. “To Thomas Jefferson, 8 December 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4648. [Last Accessed: 15 Jul 2021]
  • Utter, William T. The Frontier State: 1803-1825, A History of the State of Ohio Volume II. Columbus, OH: Ohio Historical Society, 1968 [1942].

Featured Image: “Joseph Hamilton Daveiss,” courtesy of Wikipedia


3.34 – Conspiracy



Year(s) Discussed: 1806-1807

Aaron Burr’s plans were finally starting to come to fruition, but little did the former Vice President know that he had a turncoat in his midst. Meanwhile, as the Jefferson administration struggled to get a grasp of the scope of the conspiracy, it was forced to action, and the haphazard nature of it would have consequences on down the line. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “Blennerhassett Island Home,” courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


SATT 002 – Henry Knox



Tenure of Office: 12 September 1789 – 31 December 1794

Henry Knox served the United States as a general and as the head of the War Department for ten years, but will his life and career earn him a seat at the table of the Cabinet All-Stars? Listen as we explore Knox’s legacy to find out!

Thanks so much to my special guests for this episode – Rob and Jamie from Totalus Rankium!

Featured Image: “Henry Knox” by Gilbert Stuart [c. 1806], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.33 – Source Notes



Special thanks to Steve Guerra of the History of the Papacy and Beyond the Big Screen podcasts for providing the intro quote for this episode, and special thanks to Andrew Pfannkuche for his audio editing work on this episode!

  • Ambrose, Stephen E. Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997 [1996].
  • Chipman, Donald E, and Harriet Denise Joseph. Spanish Texas, 1519-1821, Revised Edition. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2011 [2009].
  • Fellman, David. “Habeas Corpus.” Hall, Kermit L, etc, eds. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992. pp. 357-358.
  • Harrison, Lowell H. John Breckinridge: Jeffersonian Republican. Louisville, KY: The Filson Club, 1969.
  • Hatfield, Joseph T. William Claiborne: Jeffersonian Centurion in the American Southwest. Lafayette, LA: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press, 1976.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on a Cabinet Meeting, 22 October 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4462. [Last Accessed: 9 Jul 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on a Cabinet Meeting, 24 October 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4465. [Last Accessed: 12 Jul 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Notes on a Cabinet Meeting, 25 October 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4470. [Last Accessed: 12 Jul 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Proclamation re Military Expeditions against Spain, 27 November 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4597. [Last Accessed: 14 Jul 2021]
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lester, Malcolm. Anthony Merry Redivivus: A Reappraisal of the British Minister to the United States, 1803-6. Charlottesvile, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1978.
  • Lewis, James E, Jr. The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2017.
  • Lewis, Meriwether. “To Thomas Jefferson, 23 September 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4310. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • Masterson, William H. Tories and Democrats: British Diplomats in Pre-Jacksonian America. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1985.
  • McMichael, Andrew. Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida 1785-1810. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2008.
  • Moulton, Gary E. The Lewis and Clark Expedition Day by Day. Lincoln, NE and London: University of Nebraska Press, 2018.
  • Stewart, David O. American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011.
  • Thorning, Joseph F. Miranda: World Citizen. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida Press, 1967.
  • Withey, Lynne. Dearest Friend: A Life of Abigail Adams. New York & London: Simon & Schuster, 2002 [1981].
  • Zacks, Richard. The Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, the First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805. New York: Hyperion, 2005.

Featured Image: “Le général Louise-Marie Turreau (1756-1816), lors de l’affaire de Gravière (8 prairial, an VIII – 21 mai 1800)” by Louis Hersent [c. 1800], courtesy of Wikipedia


3.33 – Glimmers of Hope



Year(s) Discussed: 1805-1806

With American and Spanish military forces amassing along the western US border and with the commanding general of the Army potentially involved in a secession and/or filibustering plot with the former Vice President, late 1806 was a time of trepidation for President Jefferson and his administration. Before long, though, a few hopeful prospects started to appear including the return of Jefferson’s protege turned continental explorer, Meriwether Lewis. Sources used for this episode can be found at http://presidencies.blubrry.com.

Featured Image: “James Wilkinson” by Charles Willson Peale [c. 1797], courtesy of Wikipedia

Intro and Outro Music: Selections from “Jefferson and Liberty” as performed by The Itinerant Band


SATT 001 – Alexander Hamilton



Tenure of Office: 11 September 1789 – 31 January 1795 (Secretary of the Treasury)

We begin our new special series with the first Cabinet member to assume office under the constitutional government – Alexander Hamilton! You may have seen the musical, but there are a few more parts of his history that didn’t make it into that production.

Thanks so much to my special guest for this episode – Alycia from the Civics & Coffee Podcast!

Featured Image: “Alexander Hamilton” by John Trumbull [c. 1805], courtesy of Wikipedia


SATT – Intro to Ongoing Special Series



Introduction to a new special series of episodes titled “Seat at the Table” where I will be joined by special guests each episode to discuss a Cabinet member’s life and tenure in office and rank how they did before determining if they deserve a seat at the table of Cabinet All-Stars.

Featured Images: “Alexander Hamilton” by John Trumbull [c. 1805], courtesy of Wikipedia; “Hamilton Fish” by Mathew Brady, courtesy of Wikipedia; “Frances Perkins” [c. 1932], courtesy of Wikipedia; and “Jesse Brown,” courtesy of Wikipedia


3.32 – Source Notes



Special thanks to John for providing the intro quote for this episode and to Andrew Pfannkuche for providing audio editing assistance for this episode!

  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. ““To Thomas Jefferson, 10 January 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-2980. [Last Accessed: 19 Jun 2021]
  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. “To Thomas Jefferson, 10 February 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3210. [Last Accessed: 19 Jun 2021]
  • Daveiss, Joseph Hamilton. “To Thomas Jefferson, 14 July 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4028. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Fenster, Julie M. Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation. New York: Broadway Books, 2016.
  • Hart, Stephen Harding; and Archer Butler Hulbert, eds. The Southwestern Journals of Zebulon Pike, 1806-1807. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2007.
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To Joseph Hamilton Daveiss, 15 February 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3242. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “Proclamation re Henry Whitby, 3 May 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3682. [Last Accessed: 14 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William DuVal, 14 June 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-3844. [Last Accessed: 11 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To William Armistead Burwell, 17 September 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4285. [Last Accessed: 18 Jun 2021]
  • Jefferson, Thomas. “To George Morgan, 19 September 1806,” Founders Online, National Archives, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/99-01-02-4294. [Last Accessed: 20 Jun 2021]
  • Johnson, David. John Randolph of Roanoke. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
  • Landry, Jerry. The Presidencies of the United States. 2017-2021. http://presidencies.blubrry.com.
  • Lewis, James E, Jr. The Burr Conspiracy: Uncovering the Story of an Early American Crisis. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2017.
  • Linklater, Andro. An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson. New York: Walker Publishing Co, 2009.
  • Malone, Dumas. Jefferson the President Second Term, 1805-1809: Jefferson and His Time, Volume Five. Boston: Little, Brown and Co, 1974.
  • McGrath, Tim. James Monroe: A Life. New York: Penguin Random House, 2020.
  • Meacham, Jon. Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power. New York: Random House, 2012.
  • Orsi, Jared. Citizen Explorer: The Life of Zebulon Pike. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Featured Image: “Charles James Fox” by Anton Hinkel [c. 1794], courtesy of Wikipedia